Angel Callañaupa Porvenir Peruq Llank’ananmanta Riman


RIMASUN Angel Porvenir Peru Quechua Rimasun podcast Porvenir Peru CLACS NYU Fundacion non-profit Cusco Chinchero2016 watapi, Christine Mladic Janney Urubambaman riran. Haqaypi, pay Angel Callañaupawan Ernesto Zulligerwan ima huñunakuran. Kay iskay qharikuna anchata llank’ashanku wakin huch’uy llaqtakuna orqokunapi Chincheroneqpi Qosqopi. Fundacioniyoq Ernesto kan, sutin Fundación Porvenir Perú, ichaqa Angel asqha yanapashanpuni. Kay podcastpi, Christine Angel ima paypa llank’ananmanta rimashanku.

CLACS NYU Rimasun podcast Quechua Logo Porvenir Peru Runasimi CuscoEn el 2016, Christine Mladic Janney viajó a Urubamba para encontrarse con Angel Callañaupa y Ernesto Zulliger. Ernesto y Angel trabajan en projectos con comunidades pequeñas cerca de Chinchero, Cusco, como parte de la Fundación Porvenir Perú, la cual Ernesto fundó, pero Angel participa como parte integral. En este podcast, Christine y Angel conversan sobre su trabajo.

In 2016, Christine Mladic Janney traveled to Urubamba to meet with Angel Callañaupa and Ernesto Zulliger. Ernesto and Angel both do projects with small highland communities above Chinchero, Cusco, as part of the Fundación Porvernir Perú, which Ernesto founded but of which Angel is an integral part. In this podcast, Christine and Angel converse about his work.

Next Week at CLACS: PoeTea, NYPL Oral History, CineCLACS and Revolutionary Feminism!

We’ve got amazing events planned for next week here at CLACS at NYU! It’ll be a busy week–from having the New York Public Library’s Community Oral History Project on site to hosting an important discussion on feminism in Latin America–and we want to invite you along! All our events are free and open to NYU students and faculty as well as the general public. Read below for short descriptions on the upcoming events, and we hope to see you here next week!

On Monday, join us in celebrating National Poetry Month at PoeTea! We’re collaborating with the Haitian Creole Language Institute of New York to showcase the work of young local Haitian poets and spoken word artists and also sharing traditional Haitian teas. This is the perfect opportunity to witness the power of poetry and storytelling all while learning about a part of Haitian culture that has been around for centuries! Additional refreshments and drinks will also be served. Event starts at 6:30pm, for more info visit the event page on our website.

On Tuesday, we’re hosting a brown bag lunch talk featuring the NYPL Community Oral History Project! We’ve invited Alexandra Kelly, Manager of Adult Programming and Outreach Services at the NYPL and director of the Community Oral History Project, to present and lead discussion around the project model and the challenges around maintaining oral history standards in a large-scale volunteer-driven project. Event starts at 12:30pm, for more info visit the event page on our website.

Also on Tuesday, CineCLACS presents a collaborative documentary produced by filmmaker and faculty member Peter Lucas. We’ll be screening The Rules, a film shot in Rio de Janeiro that prompts participants to answer the question, “If you could break the rules… what would you do?” The screening will be followed by a conversation with the filmmaker. Event starts at 6:30pm, for more info visit the event page on our website.

On Friday, CLACS and Ni Una Menos NYC is hosting Verónika Mendoza, last year’s Peruvian presidential candidate and women’s rights advocate, in a conversation about the power of intersectional feminist leadership in the process of ending feminicides and gender inequality in Peru and Latin America. This conversation will also feature Claudia Salazar, author of “La Sangre de la Aurora, and will be moderated by CLACS faculty member Pamela Calla as part of her Feminist Constellations and Intercultural Paradigms working group. The event will be held in Spanish and simultaneous interpretation will be provided. Event starts at 5:00pm, for more info visit the event page on our website.

We hope you can join us next week! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for more information on our events; there’s always something happening at #CLACSatNYU!

Imadi kan kichwa warmikuna?

Mirian_family

Kay podcastpi parlarikanchik runa warmikuna imada rurashkada kikin kunaq yuyayda p’akta chingabuk.

En este podcast, hablamos con Mirian sobre cómo las mujeres indígenas trabajan para alcanzar sus sueños.

In this podcast, we speak with Mirian on how indigenous woman strive to reach their goals.

Jony Hernan Prudencio Parlan Gerardo Huaracha Huarachawan Historiata Yanquemanta

Rimasun_Jony-y-Gerardo-Yanque

Gerardo Huaracha Huaracha museoyoq kan Yanque llaqtapi, Valle del Colcapi, Arequipa, Peru. Gerardoq taytan wasichakuran, ña huk pachaq iskay chunka watakunamantaña. Chay wasipi museo kaq ichaqa qayna Agosto killapi, 2016pi, hatun pachakuyuy chayta thunichiran. Kay podcastpi, grabasqa qayna Mayopi, Jony Hernan Prudencio, wayna Tuti llaqtamanta, tayta Gerardowan parlashan museonmanta.

Rimasun_Gerardo-Museo-Yanque

Tayta Gerardo takes Jony on a tour through his museum in Yanque.

Gerardo Huaracha Huaracha tiene un Museo en el Valle del Colca en Arequipa, Peru. El padre de Gerardo construyó la casa él mismo, hace más de ciento veinte años. En esta casa solía ser un museo pero el Agosto pasado, en el 2016, un terremoto la derrumbó. En este podcast, grabado en el mes de Mayo, Jony Hernan Prudencio, un joven del pueblo de Tuti, habla con el tayta Gerardo sobre el museo.

Gerardo Huaracha Huaracha has a Museum in the Town of Yanque, in the Colca Valley in Arequipa, Peru. Gerardo’s father built the house himself, more than a hundred and twenty years ago. This house used to be a Museum but last August, in 2016, an earthquake knocked it over. In this podcast, recorded in the month of May, Jony Hernan Prudencio, a young man from the town of Tuti, talks to tayta Gerardo about the museum.

Wynnie Lamour on The Sanité Bélair Women’s Empowerment Series

SaniteBelair

At CLACS at NYU we’ve been celebrating International Women’s Month by hosting The Sanité Bélair Women’s Empowerment Series all this month. So far, we’ve hosted Black Afro-feminist activist Fania Noel and rapper and spoken word artist Theresa Sophia Alphonse. Later this month we’ll be hosting Stephani Saintonge, an award-winning filmmaker & documentarian. To give the CLACS at NYU’s community more insight about the inspiration behind the series, Haitian Creole Language Institute founder Wynnie Lamour talks about Sanité Bélair and the deep historical roots that ground the events:

“Despite the invaluable contribution of many women in Caribbean history, their voices and stories have often been left by the wayside, having fallen prey to the whims of a society that often undervalues women. From providing the nurture needed by their communities to blazing new pathways, women have always lead the way for movements of great change.

The Sanité Bélair Women’s Empowerment Series was born out of a desire to celebrate and center the visionary work of contemporary Caribbean women. Sanité Bélair was a Haitian freedom fighter and revolutionary, and one of the few women soldiers who fought during the Haitian Revolution at the turn of the 19th century. Sanité, whom Dessalines described as “a tigress,” is formally recognized by the Haitian Government as a National Heroine of Haiti.

Just as the Haitian Revolution led the way for so many others in the Caribbean, the courage and fortitude displayed by Sanité during the Haitian Revolution was unparalleled and continues to echo in the spirits of many Haitian women today. Her passion and fire serve as inspiration for the three Modern-Day Revolutionary women being featured this month in the Sanité Bélair Women’s Empowerment Series: Fania Noel, Black Afro-Feminist Activist; Theresa Sophia Alphonse, Rapper & Spoken Word Artist; and Stephani Saintonge, award-winning Filmmaker & Documentarian.”

New Yorkpi, Tayta Paypa Ususin ima Runasimimanta Rimashanku

rimasun quechua passing down CLACS NYU

Kay podcastpi, huk tayta paypa ususin ima runasimimanta rimashanku. Paykuna Perumanta kanku, ichaqa ña wakin watakunaña New Yorkpi tishanku. Tayta runasimita rimayta atin, ichaqa paypa ususin mana atinchu. Paykuna imaraykumanta rimashanku.

En este podcast, un padre y su hija hablan sobre su uso del idioma quechua. Son del Perú, pero ya desde hace unos años viven en Nueva York. El padre puede hablar en quechua, pero su hija no, y conversan sobre esta realidad que viven a diario.

In this podcast, a father and his daughter speak about Quechua language use in their family. They are from Peru, but have lived in New York for many years. The father can speak in Quechua, but the daughter cannot; together they reflect on this reality.

Thinking Through Milanich’s Children of Fate in Contemporary Times

By Amanda Sommer Lotspike, MA candidate at CLACS

“No Charges Filed Against Off-Duty LAPD Officer,” the headline reads. A video shows a grown white man bearing a gun, clutching the shirt of a child. Another grown white man stands away with his hands in his pockets, while children rush to support the child, who is being dragged by the hands of the grown white man. In the news, the perpetrator’s name is concealed to protect his identity. As he walks free, two children are detained in the Orange County Juvenile Hall.

Today’s February 26. This weekend, forensics teams searched the periphery of the home of the grown white man to protect his private property from future damage. Today’s February 26, and five years have passed since Trayvon Martin’s death. His murderer, a grown man, still walks free. In response to the most recent shooting, The LAPD labor union releases a statement: “an officer has the right to self-defense no matter the age of the offender.”[1]

To talk about recognition and intelligibility under liberalism means engaging with the present. In our Introduction to Latin American and Caribbean Studies II seminar this week, Nara Milanich was invited to speak to our class on the topic of law, filial relations and the production of social inequalities in late nineteenth century Chile. In Children of Fate: Childhood, Class, and the State in Chile, 1850-1930, Milanich traces the paradoxes of liberalism and the ways in which transformations in civil law regarding the family actually re-instated social inequalities. Here, continuity with longstanding social practices rather than rupture, marks the trajectory of the liberal state. One example is the increasing secularization and growth of state power matched by a contradictory emphasis on private rights and personal freedom. Another more pointed example is the function of judicial authorities who characterized children as “too young to ‘determine the use of his person,’” yet acknowledged their self-determination.[2]

During class discussion we drew on contemporary examples of racialized, classed and gendered discourses that castigate certain types of child rearing, and which wield the legal classification of “child” (like “citizen”) as a tool to construct and reinforce social and political hierarchies. I thought about our discussion as I read the news headline today. I thought about the reach of state power in the form of an officer’s gun on a child, while the same state (the legal system) asserts the perpetrator’s private rights by protecting his identity. I thought about how legal definitions of childhood and adulthood fall away when a pillar of the liberal state is held up to scrutiny, when “an officer has the right to self-defense no matter the age of the offender.”

Notes

[1] No Charges Filed Against Off-Duty LAPD Officer, Anaheim Mayor ‘Deeply Disturbed’ By Video. February 23, 2017. Retrieved February 26, 2017, from http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2017/02/23/anaheim-protest-arrests

[2] Milanich, N. B. (2009). Children of fate: Childhood, class, and the state in Chile, 1850-1930. Durham: Duke University Press, 123.