Teachers in Residence Present at K-12 Educator Conference

CLACS K-12 Educator Conference
Teaching Latin America’s migration history in the classroom can be a challenge. The most recent K-12 Educator Conference focused on just this issue, bringing scholars and educators together for a day of learning and exchange.

Two educators participating in the CLACS Teacher Residency Program spoke at the event. David Hanna currently teaches at University Neighborhood High School, and presented on “The Great (Quiet) Migration: Brazil.” Ariela Rothstein is a teacher at East Brooklyn Community High School, and she gave a presentation on “Perspectives on the Cuban Revolution: Social class, equality of opportunity and equality of outcomes before and after the Cuban Revolution.”

CLACS piloted its first Teacher Residency Program in 2010. Through this program, select teachers work closely with NYU faculty members, NYU Bobst Library resources, and CLACS K-12 outreach staff on Latin American research topics. Residents receive expert support, and have the opportunity to develop curricular materials for use in their classrooms.

Latin American Migrations was the research topic for the Fall 2011 CLACS Teacher Residency program. David Hanna and Ariela Rothstein spent the last several months working with NYU faculty and CLACS support staff in order to develop classroom materials on a particular area of interest. This conference was the culminating event for the 2011 Teacher Resident Program, giving the Residents an opportunity to present materials and get feedback from an audience of their peers.

Jose MoyaProfessor Jose Moya, a historian at Barnard College and Columbia University, was the keynote speaker. His presentation focused on migration in relation to the historical development of Latin America and its diaspora. He has written extensively on global migration, gender, and labor; and has been a repeat Fullbright Fellow in Buenos Aires, a Burkhardt Fellow in Rome, a Del Amo Fellow in Madrid, and held a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Visit the CLACS website to learn more about the K-12 Teacher Residency program.

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