‘Teaching Global History’ Project Brings Educators and Scholars Together

CLACS - Global History Project

Teachers meet about the "Teaching Global History" book project.

The “Teaching Global History” book project aims to bridge the gap between historians and history teachers.  A group of four New York City public high school teachers, with help from NYU graduate students, are working to translate cutting edge history scholarship to a format that works for high school classrooms.

Mike Stoll and Maia Merin, both doctoral students in the Teaching and Learning department at NYU’s Steinhardt School, are coordinating the book’s Latin American history chapter, with institutional support from CLACS.

“We want to get historians in touch with history teachers, and try to narrow the divide,” says Maia.

The goal of “Teaching Global History,” is to suggest new ways of teaching global history that bring college-level academic scholarship to a level that younger students can engage with. Project coordinators and teachers will observe the curriculum in the classroom setting, and then evaluate the efficacy of the teaching themes and strategies.

“The point is to get historians to talk to history teachers about instruction that actually happens in schools,” Mike says.

Mike Stoll previously worked with CLACS on K-12 Outreach projects. He provided pedagogical input to residents in the CLACS Teacher Residency Program as they developed curricular materials. Mike was also part of the editorial team that produced a similar book on U.S. history called, “Teaching U.S. History: Dialogues Among Social Studies Teachers and Historians.”

Participating teachers will debut the curriculum in their classrooms this April.

“The interesting thing is that there’s no template or format for what we’re looking for. Pretty much whatever the story is, is what the story is,” Mike says. For him, the process of developing, testing, and then analyzing the curriculum is  as important as the final product.

The project team will focus their curriculum around the theme of social democracy in Latin America, which has taken a particular shape over the past century.  Some teachers will focus on specific countries, such as Mexico, or Cuba and the 1959 revolution, while others focus more broadly on regions – such as the Caribbean.

The books is expected to be published in 2013.

Visit the CLACS website to learn more about CLACS K-12 Outreach initiatives, resources, and curricular materials developed by participants in the CLACS Teacher Residency Program.

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