Category Archives: Events and Happenings

Map and territory: LIFE TRANSLATED FOR OTHERS (3)

by Santiago Barcaza S.

When the Nobel Prize was given to Beckett, the Swedish Academy considered the set of its texts in English and French as a single work and at the award ceremony, its dedication to “one man, two languages ​​and a third nation” [ Ireland]”.

Beckett is the self-translator who has received more attention and more studies have been done since he was the first to arouse interest in self-translation as a subject of study (Cohn, 1961). The anecdote is the following: the impossibility of finding an English publisher for his texts, considered at the time as untranslatable, caused the author to translate into French his work Murphy, written in English and published in 1938. From 1946, Beckett writes only in French, something that is quite difficult for him, and he translates himself into English. The recognition comes in 1953, year of the appearance of En attendant Godot and Trilogie. The self-translation into English of the first, Waiting for Godot, appears a year later, in 1954, when it is reconciled with the English language. From that moment on, he continues writing in both languages ​​and exchanging the directions of the self-translation.

By the way, to the question, why self-translate? It is not difficult to understand the eagerness of authors like Tagore or Beckett to reach more readers, to ambition as soon as possible a place in the history of universal literature. But there is also another literature. There is a literature that comes from the bosom of cultures that resist extinction, languages ​​that do not give ground to the languages ​​of the colonizers.

odi gonzales
The poet Odi Gonzales

I held a conversation with Odi Gonzales (Cuzco, 1961), poet, translator, self-translator, professor and researcher at NYU, where among other topics we spoke about the Quechua language and its resistance. Here are some fragments of that conversation:

“In a language in danger of extinction, the passage of time will always generate profits and losses. For example, the advent of technological devices and the Internet allow you to communicate with monolingual children from a rural school in the Andes and record the conversation; or make documentaries, movies, photography, etcetera. These records are documents that will not be deleted, they will survive the speakers themselves. That is a gain. But at the same time, these media, with hegemony in Castilian or English, are undermining the speech of monolinguals or bilinguals, who tend to use more the acquired language, to incorporate neologisms into their lexicon”.

And with regard to the orality of the Quechua language, he tells us:

“For example, in the Quechua oral stories, there is no omniscient narrator, since that would make the story implausible: the narrator can not be in two places at once, or know what his characters think. On the other hand, in writing [in the dominant language], the omniscient narrator is crucial, indispensable. Likewise, we believed that Joyce had invented the interior monologue in Ulysses, that paradigm of the modern novel. But the truth is that internal monologue is common practice of oral languages. In Quechua, it is configured exclusively with the pronoun us (ñoqayku), which involves the narrator and his immediate surroundings. The poet speaks for himself and for his own, not for others. The great difference between the interior monologue of a foxs tale and that of Ulysses, is the extension. By its nature, the inner monologue of an oral story is short, precise and concrete, composed only a sentence or two. Instead, Bloom’s inner monologue is a 42-page stream”.

(You can check the complete interview in Spanish here)

With Quechua, Odi talks to us about a kind of oraliture (?). The translations come and go, from the first to the second language and vice versa, and in the turns the words are polished together like stones. As explained by Odi, oral literature as an artistic expression of the Andean cosmovision, marks a cultural continuity between what has been and what it is today. Authors who live in communities and in cities, who permanently travel the path between both spaces. Making their lives territory of coexistence and conflict: between tradition and modernity, between the community and the individual, between the original language and the imposed language. But at the same time, translating, or rather self-translating, the complex message that is transmitted from the oral to the written, and vice versa. Because after all, how do you create a literature that is not written?

Map and territory. A fictitious and real construction at the same time, by authors descendants of peoples and subjugated cultures. A fiction that delimits a territory with diffuse borders, with authors whose mother tongue is the dominant one, but who possess the strength to fulfill the mission of not turning their back on their ancestors.

In the next installment, we will approach the work of Mapuche poets, from the Kenyan Ngugi Wa Thiong’o and we will follow the dialogue with Rodrigo Rojas.

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Coming up in CLACS: Spotlight on U.S-Latin America Relations

Over the following week, the Center for Latin American Studies at NYU will be hosting two events that deal with the United States’ influence on Latin America.

First off, on Monday, March 9th, is The U.S., Mexico, and Latin America: A New Agenda for a New Reality. This event will feature a conversation with Dr. Jorge Castañeda, former Foreign Minister of Mexico (2000-2003) and Global Distinguished Professor of Politics and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU, about the current and future status of U.S.-Latin American relations. An important emphasis will be placed on the impact that the 2018 elections in Latin America will have on trade, migration.

This conference is organized by the Human Rights and International Law League (THRILL), the Mexican Student Association (MEXSA), and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS). This discussion will be followed by a light reception.

The event will take place in the Auditorium C95 at the Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life (238 Thompson St) at NYU, starting at 17:30. You can RSVP here!

Prof. Jorge Castañeda

Dr. Jorge Castañeda, former Foreign Minister of Mexico and Global Distinguished Professor of Politics and Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

The following week, on Monday, March 16th, our focus shifts to the Caribbean for the event Puerto Rico Before and After María. Six months after hurricanes Irma and María, Puerto Rico is ruled and abandoned by the metropolis, with a collapsed economic model, shrinking population and the aftereffects of these natural disasters. Is there light at the end of the tunnel for the island?

Join Dr. Ángel Collado-Schwarz, Adjunct Professor at Columbia University and author of several books including Decolonization Models for America’s Last Colony: Puerto Rico, for a conversation about the island’s future under its current conditions. Dr. Collado-Schwarz is also the host of a weekly radio program, La Voz del Centro, at Univision in Puerto Rico and New York.

The event will take place in the Auditorium at the King Juan Carlos of Spain Center (53 Washington Square S), starting at 18:00. Following the conversation, refreshments will be served. RSVP here!

Puerto Rico Before and After María

A talk with Dr. Àngel Collado-Schwartz (Columbia University) on Puerto Rico’s resilience after hurricanes Irma and María.

Spotlight on Brazil this Week at CLACS

On Thursday, March 22nd CLACS will be hosting two events that will bring a spotlight on Brazil.  First at 12:30pm, Professor Marcos Cueto (Casa de Oswaldo Cruz and Visiting Scholar at the the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University) will be presenting a lecture titled “Brazil, Aids, and Global Health, 1996-2008.” In 1996, Brazil was the first country in the world to provide full and free access to antiretrovirals as part of a broad prevention and treatment health program. This decision was challenged by powerful pharmaceutical companies.  Cueto’s presentation will discuss the meanings and vicissitudes of universal access to antiretrovirals in global health at the turn of the 21st century and will be followed by a Q&A session with the scholar.

To RSVP for this event click here.

The same evening at 6pm, we will be hosting Um Filme de Dança, a film directed and produced by Carmen Luz. The film is a pioneering documentary on the history of Brazilian dance. Filmed in four major Brazilian cities and in New York, this documentary shows the personal histories, philosophies and work of some of the most active black creators of dance in Brazil. It celebrates the perseverance of black dancers and choreographers of different generations and the black body’s dominion over its own dance. Organized by NYU Cinema Studies PhD candidate Léonardo Cortana, the screening will be followed by a panel discussion with the Brazilian filmmaker Carmen Luz, Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD candidate Maria Fantinato, and performer Autumn Knight. This event is co-sponsored with the NYU Institute of African American Affairs, NYU Leadership Initiative and NYU Cinema Studies.

To RSVP to this event click here.

Un filme de danca

Upcoming Events November 6-11, 2017

CLACS has yet another jam-packed week of events for you to attend, engange with, reflect on, and enjoy. If you are unable to attend the event in person, check out our facebook page, because there is a good chance that there will be a live-stream. This week, events range from critically analyzing the aftermath of hurricanes Irma and Maria, celebrating Mexican music, and collaborating with Quechua speakers and students from across North America.

HURRICANE SEASON: SOVEREIGNTY & CATASTROPHE IN THE CARIBBEAN

A roundtable on the aftermath of hurricanes Irma and Maria. How have environmental and colonial histories shaped recent events? What fragile infrastructures and uncertain sovereignties have been revealed?

Monday, November 6, 2017
6:00 – 9:00 pm
King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, Auditorium
53 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012

More information about this event can be found here.

MOTHER TONGUES UNITED: LANGUAGE EXPO CELEBRATION OF LESS-COMMONLY TAUGHT LANGUAGES

Every year, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) at NYU hosts “#MotherTonguesUnited”, an event tied to a movement to unite speakers of historically undervalued languages in an effort to dispel myths and stereotypes surrounding those languages. Many languages have been included in this movement, including Papiamentu, Haitian Creole, and Garífuna.

This year, CLACS is excited to be hosting a Language Fair that focuses on less-commonly taught languages! This special edition of #MotherTonguesUnited aims to celebrate the work of various language departments and centers throughout NYU while creating a community space where students can learn about and engage in these languages.

Tuesday, November 7, 2017
4:00 – 8:30 pm
King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, Atrium
53 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012

More information about this event can be found here.

MEXICAN MUSIC IN THE GLOBAL MARKET: EXPLORING THE CULTURAL CHALLENGES & COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITIES

Mexico is the 2nd largest latin market right after Brazil. Yet, it shows no signs of stopping. Join us to as we discuss the impact of Mexican, and Latin music, in the global market, as we unravel the stories of some Mexican professionals in the music industry and musicians, as well as music industry professionals who deal with Latin American content. We will explore the cultural challenges and commercial opportunities that Mexican music has in the American market, and we will also discuss the evolution of Mexico’s music industry.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017
10:00 am – 4:00 pm
NYU Kimmel 405
60 Washington Sq S

More information about this event can be found here.

SOUND X COLOR: SOMOS MUCHO MAS CUBA

Yamay Mejias Hernandez, also known as “La Fina,” will discuss her career as an Afro-Cuban feminist rapper and Director of “Somos Mucho Mas.” Somos Mucho Mas is one of the only female-led hip-hop initiatives in Cuba and serves as an intersectional anti-racist and feminist platform for Afro-Cuban women. As a rapper and community organizer, in a country that claims to have solved issues with racism, La Fina presents a unique perspective as she uses hip-hop to fight for social change.

Friday, November 10, 2017
5:30 – 8:30 pm
Social and Cultural Analysis, Flex Space
20 Cooper Square, 4th Floor

More information about this event can be found here.

3RD QUECHUA STUDENT ALLIANCE MEETING

This annual event aims to promote an exchange of ideas between college students, professors, and the community at large who share an interest and passion for Quechua language and Andean culture. We are working towards creating a space for people of all ages and backgrounds to become dynamic leaders within their communities. Our goal is to foster networks of indigenous language advocates.

Saturday, November 11, 2017
10:00 am – 7:00 pm
King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, Atrium
53 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012

More information about this event can be found here.

Warisata en Imágenes: The Right to an Emancipatory Education

 

09-19 Event Picture (Warista en Imagens).JPG

¡Paulo Freire Vive!

The Right to an Emancipatory Education, at Risk in Latin America and the Caribbean

Discussion and photographic exposition of Warisata: the experience of the indigenous “escuela núcleo” in Bolivia.

September 19, 2017

The Ayllu School of Warisata in Bolivia, despite its short operative life (1931-1940), has been one of the most significant educational experiences in Latin America and the Caribbean. Transmitting the principles of freedom, solidarity, and reciprocity, it reevaluated the Bolivian cultural identity and sustainable communal production in harmony with mother earth.

The experience and exhibition of Warisata en Imágenes discussed the current Latin American and Caribbean context and the challenging task of creating an emancipatory education. Moreover, the conversation was geared towards the philosophical motivations—and the ends—of education as a tool for personal growth and social progress.

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Upcoming Events October 16-22, 2017

CLACS is delighted to present a full week of events, ranging from honoring Mexican literary icons, to analyzing race relations in São Paulo, to highlighting the summer fieldwork conducted by our Tinker grant recipients. If you would like to stay in the loop for CLACS, NYU, or New York City related events, sign up for our mailing list here.

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MEXICO NOW: A CELEBRATION FOR THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF JUAN RULFO’S BIRTH

The festival will commemorate the 100th anniversary of Juan Rulfo’s birthday, one of the finest novelists, short-story masters in 20th-century Latin America and an extraordinary photographer, with the New York premiere of the documentary “100 years with Juan Rulfo. A wanderer”. Five photographs and the search for the exact place in Mexico where his father took them inspired filmmaker Juan Carlos Rulfo to make this film.

Monday, October 16, 2017
Book Presentation: 7:00 pm
Documentary Screening: 8:00 pm

King Juan Carlos I Center, Auditorium
53 Washington Sq S

#mxnowfest #Mexico #Literature #JuanRuflo

dreams

DREAMS AND DEFIANCE: BROWN BAG SERIES

Visiting scholar Derrick León Washington will share some of his upcoming curatorial work on Dreams & Defiance: A World Re-Imagined and the ways this multi-sighted project builds upon Rhythm & Power: Salsa in New York, currently on display at the Museum of the City of New York (open until November 26, 2017). Mr. Washington will share new work on the limits and possibilities of public history work in museum spaces.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
1:00 – 2:00 pm
King Juan Carlos I Center, Room 404W
53 Washington Sq S

@DerrickLW @MuseumoftheCityofNY
#Salsa #Rhythm #Power

comparative racisms

RACISMS IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE WORKING GROUP: JAIME AMPARO ALVES

Abstract: With Black Lives Matter still resonating in the United States, the movement has also made a potent rallying call worldwide, with harsh police tactics and repressive state policies often breaking upon racial lines. The Anti-Black City delves into the dynamics of racial violence in Brazil, where poverty, unemployment, residential segregation and a biased criminal justice system creates urban conditions of racial precarity. It offers race as a vital lens through which to view violence and marginalization in the supposedly “raceless” São Paulo.

Friday, October 20, 2017
11:00 am – 1:00 pm
King Juan Carlos I Center, Room 404W
53 Washington Sq South

#BLM #SãoPaulo #Brazil

tinker

BACK FROM THE FIELD: TINKER STUDENT PRESENTATION ROUNDTABLE

Join us for a presentation of the summer research findings in Latin America and the Caribbean by CLACS and NYU graduate students who were recepients of the Summer 2017 Tinker Field Research Grant. A wide range of topics and areas of interests ranging from radio in Peru to social life of yaretas in Chile were covered by these awardees who will relate on their experiences. More information on the next cycle of the Tinker Field Research Grants will be shared.

This event is limited to NYU students, faculty and alumni.

Friday, October 20, 2017
1:00 – 4:00 pm
King Juan Carlos I Center, Room 404W
53 Washington Sq South

#Tinker #Fieldwork #Research

politicas publicas

POLÍTICAS PÚBLICAS CHILE

Public Policies Chile was formed three years ago by a group of Chileans who were studying in the United States, who decided to formally meet to exchange ideas and think of practical solutions to promote Chilean development. Through the organization of conferences with Chilean and international guests, a space for academic debate on public policy issues in Chile were created. More information here.

Saturday, October 21, 2017
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
King Juan Carlos I Center, Auditorium
53 Washington Sq S

@ppchile
#Chile #PublicPolicy

Other Notable Events:

Undocumented and Unafraid

Award-winning journalists and co-hosts Maria Hinojosa and Julio Ricardo Varela will record their NPR podcast “In the Thick” live from the NYU Arthur L. Carter School of Journalism next Tuesday. They’ll be speaking with an NYU Dreamer and a journalist covering DACA developments from the front lines. Register here.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
6:00 – 8:00 pm
7th Floor Commons
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY 10003
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Transgressive Citizenship & the Struggle for Social
The Great Woman Singer: Gender and Voice in Puerto Rican Music
Panel
Tuesday, October 17, 2017
6:00 pm
NYU Center for the Humanities, 20 Cooper Square

A panel discussion of Licia Fiol-Matta’s new book, The Great Woman Singer: Gender and Voice in Puerto Rican Music.
read more

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Queer Intersectionality: A Conversation with Activists
Panel
Thursday, October 19, 2017
6:00pm
BMCC Main Campus, Room N451
read more
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Bankruptcy and Citizenship: Puerto Rico, A 21st Century Colony?
Colloquium
Friday, October 20, 2017
10:00am
Princeton University, East Pyne 010, Princeton NJ
read more

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NYC Theatrical Release of TEMPESTAD by Tatiana Huezo
Film Premiere
Friday, October 20, 2017
1:00pm
Anthology Film Archives, 32 2nd Ave, New York, NY
read more

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Super Sabado: Dia de los Muertos Celebration
Community Event
October 21
11:00am
El Museo del Barrio, 1230 Fifth Ave, New York, NY
read more

Next Week at CLACS: PoeTea, NYPL Oral History, CineCLACS and Revolutionary Feminism!

We’ve got amazing events planned for next week here at CLACS at NYU! It’ll be a busy week–from having the New York Public Library’s Community Oral History Project on site to hosting an important discussion on feminism in Latin America–and we want to invite you along! All our events are free and open to NYU students and faculty as well as the general public. Read below for short descriptions on the upcoming events, and we hope to see you here next week!

On Monday, join us in celebrating National Poetry Month at PoeTea! We’re collaborating with the Haitian Creole Language Institute of New York to showcase the work of young local Haitian poets and spoken word artists and also sharing traditional Haitian teas. This is the perfect opportunity to witness the power of poetry and storytelling all while learning about a part of Haitian culture that has been around for centuries! Additional refreshments and drinks will also be served. Event starts at 6:30pm, for more info visit the event page on our website.

On Tuesday, we’re hosting a brown bag lunch talk featuring the NYPL Community Oral History Project! We’ve invited Alexandra Kelly, Manager of Adult Programming and Outreach Services at the NYPL and director of the Community Oral History Project, to present and lead discussion around the project model and the challenges around maintaining oral history standards in a large-scale volunteer-driven project. Event starts at 12:30pm, for more info visit the event page on our website.

Also on Tuesday, CineCLACS presents a collaborative documentary produced by filmmaker and faculty member Peter Lucas. We’ll be screening The Rules, a film shot in Rio de Janeiro that prompts participants to answer the question, “If you could break the rules… what would you do?” The screening will be followed by a conversation with the filmmaker. Event starts at 6:30pm, for more info visit the event page on our website.

On Friday, CLACS and Ni Una Menos NYC is hosting Verónika Mendoza, last year’s Peruvian presidential candidate and women’s rights advocate, in a conversation about the power of intersectional feminist leadership in the process of ending feminicides and gender inequality in Peru and Latin America. This conversation will also feature Claudia Salazar, author of “La Sangre de la Aurora, and will be moderated by CLACS faculty member Pamela Calla as part of her Feminist Constellations and Intercultural Paradigms working group. The event will be held in Spanish and simultaneous interpretation will be provided. Event starts at 5:00pm, for more info visit the event page on our website.

We hope you can join us next week! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for more information on our events; there’s always something happening at #CLACSatNYU!