Category Archives: K-12 Outreach and Education

La Jaula de Oro Closes Indocumentales Season

the_golden_dream

On Thursday, December 17 at 6:30pm, CLACS will be hosting the last screening of the Fall 2015 Indocumentales Series. This semester’s series will close with a “broche de oro,” as we will be presenting La Jaula de Oro. This film by director Diego Quemada-Diez has won an impressive array of awards, accolades, and distinctions.

Click here to RSVP.

With over 80 awards, including for Best Film and Best Director at the Thessaloniki Film Festival, and for Best New Director at the Chicago Film Festival, La Jaula de Oro became the most internationally awarded Mexican film in history. The film swept the 56th edition of the Ariel Awards–Mexico’s national cinema honors–receiving nine awards including for Best Picture, Debut Feature, Original Screenplay, Actor (Brandon López) and supporting actor (Rodolfo Domínguez).

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Early Latin American Migration to the U.S. Focus of Next Indocumentales

Post by Gretchen Kyle Shaheen, CLACS MA Candidate and Graduate Associate for K-12 Outreach

On Monday, November 23, CLACS will be presenting the second film in this semester’s installation of Indocumentales.  Starting at 6:30pm, we will be screening Empire of Dreams (1880-1942) of the PBS Series Latino Americans.

The second part of the Latino Americans Series, this film highlights immigration to the U.S. from Latin America during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  Empire of Dreams documents how the American population begins to be reshaped by the influx of people that began in 1880 and continues into the 1940s, as Cubans, Mexicans and Puerto Ricans begin arriving in the U.S. and start to build strong Latino-American communities in South Florida, Los Angeles and New York. 

The screening will be followed by a conversation with award-winning journalist, author, and 2015 Andres Bello Chair in Latin American Cultures and Civilizations at NYU’s King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, Juan González, and Maribel Hernandez Rivera, Executive Director of Legal Initiatives at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs.

To read more about the screening of Empire of Dreams (1880-1942), and register to attend, click here.

Viewers interested in K-12 education can find more information on ways to incorporate the themes explored in the film into their classrooms by clicking here.

Indocumentales is a film and conversation series exploring the immigrant experience. This series is done in partnership with Cinema Tropical, and What Moves You?.  For more on Indocumentales, click here.

Our last screening of 2015 will be the award-winning film by Diego Quemada-Diez entitled La Jaula de Oro. This film will be showcased on Thursday, December 17. More information here.

 

An Update: Stories of El Salvador

We have continued developing the exhibition, Stories of El Salvador: The Civil War and Its Aftermath over the course of the Fall semester. What had started as a small project to showcase the Mujeres de la Guerra Project has grown into an exhibition that will have robust collateral programming that will include a film series, symposia, and a partnership with an honors undergraduate seminar.

We have started the selection process of photos from the NACLA photographic archive that will be included in the exhibit. As we delve into the archive we have started noticing themes we will want the exhibition to highlight including civil rights abuses, U.S. involvement in the conflict, the role of religion, the refugee camps, women in leadership roles, and the resilience of the human spirit.

One of our newest collaborations is with Dr. Pamela Calla and her Spring 2014 undergraduate seminar, Women in Social Movements in Latin America. This partnership will provide freshman honors students with the opportunity to explore the role of Salvadoran women during the Civil War by working with us as we actively build the exhibition.

We have begun the exhibition design phase to conceptualize the layout and are excited to continue developing this project next semester. The exhibition will run from April 7, 2014 to May 4, 2014 at the Stoval Gallery at New York University’s Kimmel Center.

Exhibition Design

Posted by Raúl Guzmán and Camilla Querin – MA Candidates at CLACS / Museum Studies

Cinco de Mayo Explored at CLACS

David hayes Bautista Cinco de MayoCinco de Mayo is celebrated across the U.S. as a festive Mexican holiday, but it also has deep historical and cultural significance. At a CLACS K-12 Outreach event, author David Hayes Bautista presented his recently published book, El Cinco de Mayo: An American Tradition, which looks at the shifting meanings of Cinco de Mayo in historical perspective.  According to the author, Cinco de Mayo’s roots are in U.S. Latino culture, not Mexican, and reflect the aspirations and cultural changes in this community. His work is particularly rooted in California’s Mexican cultural history, and he is working on curriculum that will be made available to the California school system.

The event also featured presentations by Elizabeth Frankel-Rivera, a 3rd grade teacher at PS 333, Manhattan School for Children, and Marisa Cadena Belski, a CLACS M.A. candidate and coordinator of the K-12 Outreach Program. Elizabeth talked about her experience teaching the class, and feeling personally connected to the subject because of her husband’s Mexican nationality. Her curriculum is intended for elementary school students.

Marisa’s curriculum is intended for 6th – 12th grade students, and is more contextual and thematic, and is complemented by online and video resources. “150 years later, there continues to be a lot of confusion about the importance of Cinco de Mayo. By focusing on this era, it opens a space for investigating the ‘parallel histories’ of the U.S. and Mexico,” she says.

As a complement to  David Hayes Bautista’s emphasis on California, both Elizabeth and Marisa created materials that put Cinco de Mayo in a national historical context. Learn more about K-12 Outreach initiatives at CLACS and review our extensive online curricular materials.

Announcing the 2012 Teacher Residency Program

The CLACS Teacher Residency Program is a unique opportunity for New York City educators interested in professional and curriculum development on Latin America and the Caribbean. The program aims to provide a space for teachers to grow their own knowledge base, gather and create accessible and engaging teaching materials, and share materials with other educators.

Are you a K-12 educator? You are eligible to participate in the Teacher Residency Program, through which you gain access to NYU faculty, staff, library and resources! Learn how to apply.

IndocumentalesThis year, CLACS will be running two concurrent Residency Programs, one on US-Mexico topics and one on Andean topics.  Past Residency Programs have focused on Teaching the Cold War and Latin America, and Latin American Migrations. The first section of the residency on US-Mexico topics will give teachers the opportunity to collaborate with the Indocumentales/Undocumentaries: US/Mexico Interdependent Film Series project, and will be run concurrently with a graduate-level design course entitled Public Project at the Pratt Institute.

K-12 TeacherResidency 2012 - the AndesParticipants pursuing the second residency theme, topics related to the Andes, will expand their own knowledge base, gather and create accessible and engaging materials for a Middle or High School audience, and share materials with other educators. Residents will have the opportunity to connect with programming initiatives stemming from the CLACS Andean Initiative. Topics of focus could include indigenous movements, colonization, multiculturalism, power, natural resources and land rights, quechua and kichwa languages.

Visit the Teacher Residency Program page on the CLACS website for more information and to apply.

Learn more about the CLACS K-12 Outreach Program and K-12 curricular materials.

Profile: David Hanna of the CLACS Teacher Residency Program

As part of our K-12 Outreach, CLACS hosts a teacher residency program, attracting local educators who are interested in enhancing the Latin American studies curricula in their classrooms.

David Hanna, a history teacher at University Neighborhood High School in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, teaches Regents prep courses in both Global and U.S. History, as well as AP United States History.  In 2011 he participated in the CLACS Teacher Residency Program.

During his time in the program, he worked with NYU faculty and CLACS staff to research rural to urban migration in Brazil.  He also developed curricular materials about this topic, aimed for high school-aged students.  In January 2012, at the K-12 educator conference that marks the closing of the program, he and other participants presented their curricular materials to their peers. These curricular materials and others are available on the CLACS website for teachers around the world to use free of charge.

According to David, his students responded well to the curriculum, and had a lot to say during the activities. “They were probably the best conversations we had in class all semester,” David says.  He plans to teach the curriculum to future students.

David Hanna Knights of the SeaDavid is an avid history lover, which inspired his career choice.  His interest in history spans much farther than Latin America. This year he published his first book, titled Knights of the Sea, which chronicles the lives of two young naval officers in Maine during the War of 1812.

David says that he had a great experience participating in the teacher residency program, and that he would definitely recommend the program to other educators. “I grew as a teacher by broadening my understanding of Latin America. I also got to share my efforts with teachers from across the city both at the conference, as well as online,” David says.

In addition to the residency program, David is also contributing to the “Teaching Global History” book project, a project that brings educators and scholars together with the common goal of making recent research on global history more accessible to educators and students.

Visit the CLACS website to learn more about the Teacher Residency Program, or to access free K-12 curricular materials.

‘Teaching Global History’ Project Brings Educators and Scholars Together

CLACS - Global History Project

Teachers meet about the "Teaching Global History" book project.

The “Teaching Global History” book project aims to bridge the gap between historians and history teachers.  A group of four New York City public high school teachers, with help from NYU graduate students, are working to translate cutting edge history scholarship to a format that works for high school classrooms.

Mike Stoll and Maia Merin, both doctoral students in the Teaching and Learning department at NYU’s Steinhardt School, are coordinating the book’s Latin American history chapter, with institutional support from CLACS.

“We want to get historians in touch with history teachers, and try to narrow the divide,” says Maia.

The goal of “Teaching Global History,” is to suggest new ways of teaching global history that bring college-level academic scholarship to a level that younger students can engage with. Project coordinators and teachers will observe the curriculum in the classroom setting, and then evaluate the efficacy of the teaching themes and strategies.

“The point is to get historians to talk to history teachers about instruction that actually happens in schools,” Mike says.
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