Category Archives: Quechua-Related Info

Event Re-cap: PoeTEA, Quechua & Kreyòl Showcase

This past September 13th, the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies celebrated a night of languages and culture. Our Quechua & Kreyòl showcase included presentations by language instructors Odi Gonzales (Quechua) and Wynnie Lamour (Haitian Creole).

Students also shared poetry and participants enjoyed a playlist curated by Haitian-American DJ Sabine Blaizin, as well as delicious food and tea. It was a wonderful coming together of poets and community and a testament to the cultural relevance of the Indigenous and Diasporic Language Consortium.

Please enjoy a video re-cap of the event below:

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Andean Culture Night

Last night we celebrated Andean culture at the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center. The Runasimi Outreach Committee and Center for Latin American Studies hosted various community groups and artists representing Ecuador, Perú and Bolivia for the last Quechua night of the year.

Participants included:

Ñukanchik Llakta Wawakuna dancing Kawsay La Vida and reading a poem

Grupo Folklorico Fuerza Peruana dancing Huaylas de Carnaval

Baila Perú New York dancing Marinera from Trujillo

Odi Gonzales reading from the poetry collection Virgenes Urbanas

Pachamama dancing Tinkus

Eduardo F. Medrano Salas reading poetry

Fraternidad Cultural Pasión Boliviano dancing Salaque

Thanks so much to all our participants and everyone else who came out to share this special night with us. We enjoyed Salteñas and Api and two hours of performances! On behalf of the Runasimi Outreach Committee we hope to see you next year.

 

Profesor de CLACS presenta estudio crítico de la versión quechua del Quijote

Post and interview by Raúl A. Rodríguez Arancibia,MA Candidate at CLACS – Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU

Para más información sobre la presentación del estudio crítico del Dr. Odi Gonzales en NYU el 18 de noviembre de 2015 visite http://ow.ly/Ufutn.

En Latinoamérica, una región con una amplia población indígena, en las últimas décadas las traducciones de textos de la lengua dominante, castellano, hacia lenguas indígenas se han ido incrementando. En muchos casos, esfuerzos similares hand  promovidos por las políticas de multiculturalidad de los respectivos gobiernos. A su vez esto ha problematizado la posición del traductor en una sociedad en la cual el acceso a la producción de conocimientos ha estado sesgada a un grupo privilegiado no-indígena. En las últimas décadas, la emergencia de intelectuales indígenas ha hecho más dinámico y fructífero, tanto el traducir, como sus fines del mismo y compromisos. Estas nuevas posiciones de enunciación, más allá del clásico pensar latinoamericano desde su “heteregeneidad”–contenido en los trabajos de los 80’s y 90’s de Ángel Rama, Néstor García Canclini y Antonio Cornejo Polar—han mostrado que también dentro de aquel grupo que fue subalternizado hay posiciones críticas y un creciente debate.

En 2005, Demetrio Túpac Yupanqui, laureado traductor peruano publicó el segundo volumen en quechua de “El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote De la Mancha ” (1615) con el título “Yachay sapa wiraqucha dun Qvixote Manchamantan.” En este contexto de intercambio y en ocasion del cuarto centenario de la publicación original de “Don Quixote”, el Dr. Odi Gonzales peruano quechua hablante profesor de la NYU presentará una forma de mirar al texto Túpac Yupanqui desde aquella pluralidad del mundo indígena del cual el también es parte. La presentación del estudio crítico del Dr. Gonzales se llevará a cabo el miércoles, 18 de noviembre a las 6pm en NYU en una charla titulada “Juicio Oral: Los Entuertos del Quijote en la Versión Quechua.”  En esta entrevista, el Dr. Gonzales nos habla sobre su charla.

Thunapa and Azanaques

Post by Raúl A. Rodríguez Arancibia,MA Candidate at CLACS – Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU

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Among indigenous people of the Andes, the geographical features of the landscape play an important role beyond referencing points in space. The narratives of those features, which are humanized and genderized by their inhabitants, constitute an important role in maintaining memory of the territory. Thus, the features are protagonists of mythical stories. These narratives can be understood as tools to create a living landscape, where the unknown is understood, and nature is familiarized.

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Iyarina to remember and in remembering, to reflect

I ended up in Iyarina, Ecuador this last summer thanks to an invitation by Dr. Tod Swanson, Associate Professor at Arizona State University, after my dear friend Dr. Osvaldo Sala connected us. At the time, I was auditing a Quechua class at NYU and became very interested in the indigenous struggle related to the preservation of their lands. We talked about climate change, ecology, indigenous identity and language. He sent me the link for the Field School  that he directs near Tena, capital of the province of Napo, one of the entrances to the Ecuadorian Amazon.

While working on my graduate studies in Arizona State, I was an assistant for different study abroad programs, one in Spain for a couple of trips, as well as one in Mexico. It was through these experiences that I recognized the key role of immersion in any field the student is taking on. Since I teach Spanish as a second language, I am an advocate for these kinds of programs that help improve and solidify one’s previous knowledge.

When I took my plane from New York to Ecuador, I was not really thinking much about the program. Argentina, my home country, was playing the first soccer match for the 2014 World Cup and I was also very busy finalizing my teaching semester at New York University. I got to Iyarina one evening a week after the program started, and what I saw left me speechless. There were more than 30 students, both undergraduate and graduate, from different fields: Anthropology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Law, Psychology, Literature, Geology; 3 professors: Dr. Tod Swanson, Dr. John Frechione and Dr. Samuel St. Clair; and a whole family making the program run as smooth as you can imagine.

I was assigned to one room with a graduate student in linguistic anthropology from the University of Michigan. In the room next door was Dr. John Frechione, Associate Director of CLAS at the University of Pittsburgh. It was a nerd heaven: after a delicious traditional breakfast, we had anthropology classes with Dr. Frechione every morning and. Then, depending on the rain, we would head to the jungle with two Napo Kichwa women to hear them teach us about ecology from their traditional knowledge with Dr. Swanson’s ethnobotany class. After that, we would have lunch, and head to the last class of the day on the Napo Kichwa language. Dr. Samuel St. Clair from BYU was also teaching biology at the same time as Dr. Frechione’s class. I would have loved to take this course, but it was impossible to take all the classes. I would also see his class walk to the jungle and conduct the classes right there, in situ, explaining the beautiful world of nature to his students.

When the first session was over, we had a week off, of which I took full advantage and traveled to Otavalo, in the Andes, and then to Mompiche, a beautiful small beach near the Colombian border. When I came back to Iyarina, some students had left but I met new students that were joining us for the second term of the summer together with other professors: Alana DeLoge, who taught health in the Napo Region, and Dr. Tim Savisky who taught sustainability. Dr. Swanson was also teaching the continuation of his ethnobotany course.

During the entire 8-week program, we made traditional style ceramics, learned how to prepare chicha (a drink made of fermented yuca), we learned how to cultivate and harvest lumu (yuca), we tasted amazing traditional food, and we lived as a “minga” (a collective of people working together) with the family that ran the accommodations for all of us. Some of the highlights of this program were studying together, talking about readings, walking through the jungle with members of the community learning about medicinal plants and, by the end of the 8 weeks program, being able to speak some Kichwa! I am planning on traveling there again this upcoming summer since it is, pretty much, heaven on earth for intellectual nerds. Chita rikangauranchi!

By Marcela Naciff, Visiting Lecturer at NYU

A Successful Quechua Night with Filmmaker Gabina Funegra

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On January 30, filmmaker and academic Gabina Funegra joined the Runasimi Outreach Committee of NYU for a screening of the director’s award-winning documentary “Quechua, The Fading Incan Language.” In the film, Gabina — herself Peruvian but currently living in Australia — documents her journey to the town of Huallanca in the Peruvian Andes. It is here that Funegra explores the fading Quechua language, which her mother spoke but did not pass on to Funegra herself. After the film, NYU Quechua professor Odi Gonzales facilitated an enlightening Q&A with Gabina, which spilled over into an intimate reception where conversations about Quechua, language preservation and Andean culture continued well into the night.

Unique Courses, Great Opportunities, and Exciting Events: Welcome to Spring 2015

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Welcome to the spring 2015 semester. We certainly hope that your friends and family are safe and unharmed after this week’s blizzard. We are pleased to share several opportunities for faculty, courses being taught this semester, and an exciting schedule of events at CLACS.

The competition for Faculty Research Grants for summer 2015 and academic year 2015-16 is open. The deadline is February 17. The application this year is more streamlined, thus we encourage you to apply. More information can be found here. Also, applications are available for the Student Field and Research Grant. Those are awarded to Master’s and Doctoral students conducting fieldwork and research in Latin America and the Caribbean during this summer. The deadline for applying is February 23. For more details including an application checklist, follow this link.

Facebook Post eventOur list of events include the Spring Colloquium series titled “Latin American Independence in the Age of Revolution.” It includes a roster of talks by leading academics on the field such as Sergio Serulnikov, Victor Goldgel, Marlene Daut, Madison Smartt Bell, and Michael Zeuske. CineCLACS movie screenings feature the Indocumentales series, in partnership with Cinema Tropical, the Quechua/Kichwa film showcase, and tonight’s presentation of “Quechua, the Fading Inca Language” as part of Quechua Night, among others. Other notable events include our kickoff event “The Cuban Moment: Conversatorio on Cuba.” Also, on April 9th, a presentation of Aisha Khan’s latest book Islam and the Americas, and a conference on May 8th titled “José Antonio Aponte and his World: Writing, Painting, and Making Freedom in the African Diaspora” co-sponsored with the departments of  History and Art History. Our series of workshops and brown bag seminars will feature a presentation on “Science, Obea and religion in Trinidad” by Brent Crosson, and a workshop with famed photographer and author of Violentology: Manual of the Colombian Conflict, Stephen Ferry.

Most of our events emerge from faculty-initiated projects or proposals. Have ideas for future events or projects that CLACS could support? Contact CLACS’s new Outreach Administrator Omar A. Dauhajre at omar.dauhajre@nyu.edu and share your thoughts.

We are also very excited about our catalog of unique course offerings this semester. The colloquium, led by Professors Sinclair Thompson and Sibylle Fischer, and our seminars cover a wide array of topics that will prepare our students with a comprehensive view and exhaustive understanding of Latin America and the Caribbean.

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Those seminars include: Human Rights in Latin America by Professor Peter Lucas; The Color of Race in the Americas by Professor Aisha Khan; Government & Politics of Latin America by Professor Patricio Navia; Citizenships from Below (Latin America and the Caribbean) by Professor Edgardo Pérez Morales; Internship Seminar by Professor Pamela Calla; and Ethnographic Methods in Latin America and the Caribbean by Professor Katharine Smith.

CLACS offers unique Quechua Language courses taught by Professor Odi Gonzalez. Quechua students learn the most widely spoken indigenous language in the americas, and learn about the culture, history and struggles of its native speakers.

We wish you a wonderful semester and hope to see you at CLACS!