Category Archives: Quechua-Related Info

Upcoming Events November 6-11, 2017

CLACS has yet another jam-packed week of events for you to attend, engange with, reflect on, and enjoy. If you are unable to attend the event in person, check out our facebook page, because there is a good chance that there will be a live-stream. This week, events range from critically analyzing the aftermath of hurricanes Irma and Maria, celebrating Mexican music, and collaborating with Quechua speakers and students from across North America.

HURRICANE SEASON: SOVEREIGNTY & CATASTROPHE IN THE CARIBBEAN

A roundtable on the aftermath of hurricanes Irma and Maria. How have environmental and colonial histories shaped recent events? What fragile infrastructures and uncertain sovereignties have been revealed?

Monday, November 6, 2017
6:00 – 9:00 pm
King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, Auditorium
53 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012

More information about this event can be found here.

MOTHER TONGUES UNITED: LANGUAGE EXPO CELEBRATION OF LESS-COMMONLY TAUGHT LANGUAGES

Every year, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) at NYU hosts “#MotherTonguesUnited”, an event tied to a movement to unite speakers of historically undervalued languages in an effort to dispel myths and stereotypes surrounding those languages. Many languages have been included in this movement, including Papiamentu, Haitian Creole, and Garífuna.

This year, CLACS is excited to be hosting a Language Fair that focuses on less-commonly taught languages! This special edition of #MotherTonguesUnited aims to celebrate the work of various language departments and centers throughout NYU while creating a community space where students can learn about and engage in these languages.

Tuesday, November 7, 2017
4:00 – 8:30 pm
King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, Atrium
53 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012

More information about this event can be found here.

MEXICAN MUSIC IN THE GLOBAL MARKET: EXPLORING THE CULTURAL CHALLENGES & COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITIES

Mexico is the 2nd largest latin market right after Brazil. Yet, it shows no signs of stopping. Join us to as we discuss the impact of Mexican, and Latin music, in the global market, as we unravel the stories of some Mexican professionals in the music industry and musicians, as well as music industry professionals who deal with Latin American content. We will explore the cultural challenges and commercial opportunities that Mexican music has in the American market, and we will also discuss the evolution of Mexico’s music industry.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017
10:00 am – 4:00 pm
NYU Kimmel 405
60 Washington Sq S

More information about this event can be found here.

SOUND X COLOR: SOMOS MUCHO MAS CUBA

Yamay Mejias Hernandez, also known as “La Fina,” will discuss her career as an Afro-Cuban feminist rapper and Director of “Somos Mucho Mas.” Somos Mucho Mas is one of the only female-led hip-hop initiatives in Cuba and serves as an intersectional anti-racist and feminist platform for Afro-Cuban women. As a rapper and community organizer, in a country that claims to have solved issues with racism, La Fina presents a unique perspective as she uses hip-hop to fight for social change.

Friday, November 10, 2017
5:30 – 8:30 pm
Social and Cultural Analysis, Flex Space
20 Cooper Square, 4th Floor

More information about this event can be found here.

3RD QUECHUA STUDENT ALLIANCE MEETING

This annual event aims to promote an exchange of ideas between college students, professors, and the community at large who share an interest and passion for Quechua language and Andean culture. We are working towards creating a space for people of all ages and backgrounds to become dynamic leaders within their communities. Our goal is to foster networks of indigenous language advocates.

Saturday, November 11, 2017
10:00 am – 7:00 pm
King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, Atrium
53 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012

More information about this event can be found here.

Advertisements

Warisata en Imágenes: The Right to an Emancipatory Education

 

09-19 Event Picture (Warista en Imagens).JPG

¡Paulo Freire Vive!

The Right to an Emancipatory Education, at Risk in Latin America and the Caribbean

Discussion and photographic exposition of Warisata: the experience of the indigenous “escuela núcleo” in Bolivia.

September 19, 2017

The Ayllu School of Warisata in Bolivia, despite its short operative life (1931-1940), has been one of the most significant educational experiences in Latin America and the Caribbean. Transmitting the principles of freedom, solidarity, and reciprocity, it reevaluated the Bolivian cultural identity and sustainable communal production in harmony with mother earth.

The experience and exhibition of Warisata en Imágenes discussed the current Latin American and Caribbean context and the challenging task of creating an emancipatory education. Moreover, the conversation was geared towards the philosophical motivations—and the ends—of education as a tool for personal growth and social progress.

Continue reading

Event Re-cap: PoeTEA, Quechua & Kreyòl Showcase

This past September 13th, the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies celebrated a night of languages and culture. Our Quechua & Kreyòl showcase included presentations by language instructors Odi Gonzales (Quechua) and Wynnie Lamour (Haitian Creole).

Students also shared poetry and participants enjoyed a playlist curated by Haitian-American DJ Sabine Blaizin, as well as delicious food and tea. It was a wonderful coming together of poets and community and a testament to the cultural relevance of the Indigenous and Diasporic Language Consortium.

Please enjoy a video re-cap of the event below:

Andean Culture Night

Last night we celebrated Andean culture at the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center. The Runasimi Outreach Committee and Center for Latin American Studies hosted various community groups and artists representing Ecuador, Perú and Bolivia for the last Quechua night of the year.

Participants included:

Ñukanchik Llakta Wawakuna dancing Kawsay La Vida and reading a poem

Grupo Folklorico Fuerza Peruana dancing Huaylas de Carnaval

Baila Perú New York dancing Marinera from Trujillo

Odi Gonzales reading from the poetry collection Virgenes Urbanas

Pachamama dancing Tinkus

Eduardo F. Medrano Salas reading poetry

Fraternidad Cultural Pasión Boliviano dancing Salaque

Thanks so much to all our participants and everyone else who came out to share this special night with us. We enjoyed Salteñas and Api and two hours of performances! On behalf of the Runasimi Outreach Committee we hope to see you next year.

 

Profesor de CLACS presenta estudio crítico de la versión quechua del Quijote

Post and interview by Raúl A. Rodríguez Arancibia,MA Candidate at CLACS – Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU

Para más información sobre la presentación del estudio crítico del Dr. Odi Gonzales en NYU el 18 de noviembre de 2015 visite http://ow.ly/Ufutn.

En Latinoamérica, una región con una amplia población indígena, en las últimas décadas las traducciones de textos de la lengua dominante, castellano, hacia lenguas indígenas se han ido incrementando. En muchos casos, esfuerzos similares hand  promovidos por las políticas de multiculturalidad de los respectivos gobiernos. A su vez esto ha problematizado la posición del traductor en una sociedad en la cual el acceso a la producción de conocimientos ha estado sesgada a un grupo privilegiado no-indígena. En las últimas décadas, la emergencia de intelectuales indígenas ha hecho más dinámico y fructífero, tanto el traducir, como sus fines del mismo y compromisos. Estas nuevas posiciones de enunciación, más allá del clásico pensar latinoamericano desde su “heteregeneidad”–contenido en los trabajos de los 80’s y 90’s de Ángel Rama, Néstor García Canclini y Antonio Cornejo Polar—han mostrado que también dentro de aquel grupo que fue subalternizado hay posiciones críticas y un creciente debate.

En 2005, Demetrio Túpac Yupanqui, laureado traductor peruano publicó el segundo volumen en quechua de “El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote De la Mancha ” (1615) con el título “Yachay sapa wiraqucha dun Qvixote Manchamantan.” En este contexto de intercambio y en ocasion del cuarto centenario de la publicación original de “Don Quixote”, el Dr. Odi Gonzales peruano quechua hablante profesor de la NYU presentará una forma de mirar al texto Túpac Yupanqui desde aquella pluralidad del mundo indígena del cual el también es parte. La presentación del estudio crítico del Dr. Gonzales se llevará a cabo el miércoles, 18 de noviembre a las 6pm en NYU en una charla titulada “Juicio Oral: Los Entuertos del Quijote en la Versión Quechua.”  En esta entrevista, el Dr. Gonzales nos habla sobre su charla.

Thunapa and Azanaques

Post by Raúl A. Rodríguez Arancibia,MA Candidate at CLACS – Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU

portada de layra parla 3

Among indigenous people of the Andes, the geographical features of the landscape play an important role beyond referencing points in space. The narratives of those features, which are humanized and genderized by their inhabitants, constitute an important role in maintaining memory of the territory. Thus, the features are protagonists of mythical stories. These narratives can be understood as tools to create a living landscape, where the unknown is understood, and nature is familiarized.

Continue reading

Iyarina to remember and in remembering, to reflect

I ended up in Iyarina, Ecuador this last summer thanks to an invitation by Dr. Tod Swanson, Associate Professor at Arizona State University, after my dear friend Dr. Osvaldo Sala connected us. At the time, I was auditing a Quechua class at NYU and became very interested in the indigenous struggle related to the preservation of their lands. We talked about climate change, ecology, indigenous identity and language. He sent me the link for the Field School  that he directs near Tena, capital of the province of Napo, one of the entrances to the Ecuadorian Amazon.

While working on my graduate studies in Arizona State, I was an assistant for different study abroad programs, one in Spain for a couple of trips, as well as one in Mexico. It was through these experiences that I recognized the key role of immersion in any field the student is taking on. Since I teach Spanish as a second language, I am an advocate for these kinds of programs that help improve and solidify one’s previous knowledge.

When I took my plane from New York to Ecuador, I was not really thinking much about the program. Argentina, my home country, was playing the first soccer match for the 2014 World Cup and I was also very busy finalizing my teaching semester at New York University. I got to Iyarina one evening a week after the program started, and what I saw left me speechless. There were more than 30 students, both undergraduate and graduate, from different fields: Anthropology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Law, Psychology, Literature, Geology; 3 professors: Dr. Tod Swanson, Dr. John Frechione and Dr. Samuel St. Clair; and a whole family making the program run as smooth as you can imagine.

I was assigned to one room with a graduate student in linguistic anthropology from the University of Michigan. In the room next door was Dr. John Frechione, Associate Director of CLAS at the University of Pittsburgh. It was a nerd heaven: after a delicious traditional breakfast, we had anthropology classes with Dr. Frechione every morning and. Then, depending on the rain, we would head to the jungle with two Napo Kichwa women to hear them teach us about ecology from their traditional knowledge with Dr. Swanson’s ethnobotany class. After that, we would have lunch, and head to the last class of the day on the Napo Kichwa language. Dr. Samuel St. Clair from BYU was also teaching biology at the same time as Dr. Frechione’s class. I would have loved to take this course, but it was impossible to take all the classes. I would also see his class walk to the jungle and conduct the classes right there, in situ, explaining the beautiful world of nature to his students.

When the first session was over, we had a week off, of which I took full advantage and traveled to Otavalo, in the Andes, and then to Mompiche, a beautiful small beach near the Colombian border. When I came back to Iyarina, some students had left but I met new students that were joining us for the second term of the summer together with other professors: Alana DeLoge, who taught health in the Napo Region, and Dr. Tim Savisky who taught sustainability. Dr. Swanson was also teaching the continuation of his ethnobotany course.

During the entire 8-week program, we made traditional style ceramics, learned how to prepare chicha (a drink made of fermented yuca), we learned how to cultivate and harvest lumu (yuca), we tasted amazing traditional food, and we lived as a “minga” (a collective of people working together) with the family that ran the accommodations for all of us. Some of the highlights of this program were studying together, talking about readings, walking through the jungle with members of the community learning about medicinal plants and, by the end of the 8 weeks program, being able to speak some Kichwa! I am planning on traveling there again this upcoming summer since it is, pretty much, heaven on earth for intellectual nerds. Chita rikangauranchi!

By Marcela Naciff, Visiting Lecturer at NYU