Tag Archives: Andes

Radio and politics in the Peruvian Altiplano

Posted by Ximena Málaga Sabogal, PhD student in Anthropology at NYU

Radio Onda Azul - XMS

I am used to being asked what anthropology is and what, as an anthropologist, do I “actually” do. I usually have a different set of answers depending on my interlocutors. But something that I always have to deal with is the “classical” definition of anthropology, the one that implies studying “a traditional way of life”. Although that definition can be a good starting point for a conversation, I try to bring it to and interest in social changes as soon as I can. If not, how to explain that analyzing the ways in which radio affects – or comes from – everyday life is also anthropology? When studying media as social and cultural repertories, anthropologists have a lot of competition in the field. I am constantly mistaken for a journalist working on a piece, which changes the interactions with my interlocutors.

What has this interest on radio to do with my search for Aymara and Quechua identity definitions and its connections with the international indigenous movement? In Puno the answer is: a lot. Radio has been present in Altiplano’s peasants’ life for a long time. In part due to the low electrification of the region, radio has been – and in some districts of Puno still is – the most popular communication device. The first radio to begin operations in Puno was Onda Azul, back in the 1950s. This is not only the first radio, it is also a very special one. It comes from an early initiative of Puno’s Catholic Church and answers to the developmental model of educación popular. In a time when Puno had one of the highest levels of illiteracy, Onda Azul worked hand in hand with the Peruvian government to develop a program of escuelas radiofónicas. Radios were given in different communities in the Aymara and Quechua sectors of Puno and every day the people would come together to listen to classes and solve exercises with the help of a facilitator. At the end of the school year, the Ministry of Education would organize exams for the people involved in the radio classes, and hand out official diplomas to the ones who passed everything.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Quechua/Kichwa Film Showcase on the Road

From June 17th to the 19th the Quechua/Kichwa film showcase May Sumak! (How Beautiful!) is going on the road  to Washington, D.C. The showcase is a celebration of indigenous and community filmmaking in the Quechua languages spoken throughout the Andes and by immigrants in the United States. Created in 2015 by the CLACS student-led Runasimi Outreach Committee (ROC), May Sumak! will be part of the National Museum of the American Indian’s ongoing exhibition The Great Inka Road The opening night will feature the film Killa  and Q&A with its director  Ecuadorian filmmaker Alberto Muenala. This conversation will be hosted by CLACS alum and former ROC member Charlie Uruchima. Click here for more details on the films, show times and venues.

maysumak ifle invite

Andean Culture Night

Last night we celebrated Andean culture at the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center. The Runasimi Outreach Committee and Center for Latin American Studies hosted various community groups and artists representing Ecuador, Perú and Bolivia for the last Quechua night of the year.

Participants included:

Ñukanchik Llakta Wawakuna dancing Kawsay La Vida and reading a poem

Grupo Folklorico Fuerza Peruana dancing Huaylas de Carnaval

Baila Perú New York dancing Marinera from Trujillo

Odi Gonzales reading from the poetry collection Virgenes Urbanas

Pachamama dancing Tinkus

Eduardo F. Medrano Salas reading poetry

Fraternidad Cultural Pasión Boliviano dancing Salaque

Thanks so much to all our participants and everyone else who came out to share this special night with us. We enjoyed Salteñas and Api and two hours of performances! On behalf of the Runasimi Outreach Committee we hope to see you next year.

 

Profesor de CLACS presenta estudio crítico de la versión quechua del Quijote

Post and interview by Raúl A. Rodríguez Arancibia,MA Candidate at CLACS – Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU

Para más información sobre la presentación del estudio crítico del Dr. Odi Gonzales en NYU el 18 de noviembre de 2015 visite http://ow.ly/Ufutn.

En Latinoamérica, una región con una amplia población indígena, en las últimas décadas las traducciones de textos de la lengua dominante, castellano, hacia lenguas indígenas se han ido incrementando. En muchos casos, esfuerzos similares hand  promovidos por las políticas de multiculturalidad de los respectivos gobiernos. A su vez esto ha problematizado la posición del traductor en una sociedad en la cual el acceso a la producción de conocimientos ha estado sesgada a un grupo privilegiado no-indígena. En las últimas décadas, la emergencia de intelectuales indígenas ha hecho más dinámico y fructífero, tanto el traducir, como sus fines del mismo y compromisos. Estas nuevas posiciones de enunciación, más allá del clásico pensar latinoamericano desde su “heteregeneidad”–contenido en los trabajos de los 80’s y 90’s de Ángel Rama, Néstor García Canclini y Antonio Cornejo Polar—han mostrado que también dentro de aquel grupo que fue subalternizado hay posiciones críticas y un creciente debate.

En 2005, Demetrio Túpac Yupanqui, laureado traductor peruano publicó el segundo volumen en quechua de “El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote De la Mancha ” (1615) con el título “Yachay sapa wiraqucha dun Qvixote Manchamantan.” En este contexto de intercambio y en ocasion del cuarto centenario de la publicación original de “Don Quixote”, el Dr. Odi Gonzales peruano quechua hablante profesor de la NYU presentará una forma de mirar al texto Túpac Yupanqui desde aquella pluralidad del mundo indígena del cual el también es parte. La presentación del estudio crítico del Dr. Gonzales se llevará a cabo el miércoles, 18 de noviembre a las 6pm en NYU en una charla titulada “Juicio Oral: Los Entuertos del Quijote en la Versión Quechua.”  En esta entrevista, el Dr. Gonzales nos habla sobre su charla.

Thunapa and Azanaques

Post by Raúl A. Rodríguez Arancibia,MA Candidate at CLACS – Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU

portada de layra parla 3

Among indigenous people of the Andes, the geographical features of the landscape play an important role beyond referencing points in space. The narratives of those features, which are humanized and genderized by their inhabitants, constitute an important role in maintaining memory of the territory. Thus, the features are protagonists of mythical stories. These narratives can be understood as tools to create a living landscape, where the unknown is understood, and nature is familiarized.

Continue reading

Communal Workdays in the Andes

Posted by Dusty Christensen – MA Candidate at CLACS / Global Journalism at NYU

Christensen_ Ecuador_minga

Kichwa men in the village of Turuku digging a ditch for a water pipe as part of a communal work day known as a minga. (Photo by Dusty Christensen)

Early in the morning, before the daily summer winds start to howl, the music comes blaring out of the church loudspeaker. The guitars, charangos and flutes carry across the village of Turuku, waking everyone who wasn’t already out in the fields. Though the announcement won’t come for another hour, everyone knows what the wake-up call is for — today is a communal work day.

Christensen_Ecuador_Alberto

Alberto Anrango, the president of the indigenous village of Turuku, announcing the minga over the village loudspeakers. (Photo by Dusty Christensen)

At 7 o’clock — an hour after the music has started — community President Alberto Anrango pics up the mic and begins his impromptu speech. “Ladies and gentlemen,” he begins in Kichwa, his voice crackling over the old speakers mounted on top of the chapel roof. “Don’t forget that today is the minga.” He urges everyone to bring pickaxes and shovels, and warns that those skipping today will be fined by the village government.

Continue reading

A Successful Quechua Night with Filmmaker Gabina Funegra

1610866_894333003922532_637536265200100234_n

On January 30, filmmaker and academic Gabina Funegra joined the Runasimi Outreach Committee of NYU for a screening of the director’s award-winning documentary “Quechua, The Fading Incan Language.” In the film, Gabina — herself Peruvian but currently living in Australia — documents her journey to the town of Huallanca in the Peruvian Andes. It is here that Funegra explores the fading Quechua language, which her mother spoke but did not pass on to Funegra herself. After the film, NYU Quechua professor Odi Gonzales facilitated an enlightening Q&A with Gabina, which spilled over into an intimate reception where conversations about Quechua, language preservation and Andean culture continued well into the night.