Racial Justice Advocacy in Latin America and the US Explored Side by Side at NYU this Week

This week, on October 21st, 22nd, and 23rd, CLACS and the NYU Law School are presenting events that spotlight the groundwork of black activists and legal advocates for racial justice in Latin America and the US. The events will explore the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic in the struggle against racism in black communities ofContinue reading “Racial Justice Advocacy in Latin America and the US Explored Side by Side at NYU this Week”

‘Proximities/Distances’: Theatre, Performance, and Dance Conference

Creators and performers from all over Latin America and Spain will converge at the King Juan Carlos Center (KJCC) next week for ‘Proximities/Distances’, a two-day event that will explore ideas and practices of proximity and distance in contemporary Spanish and Latin American theatre, performance and dance. Drawing on the current interest in relational strategies and investigatingContinue reading “‘Proximities/Distances’: Theatre, Performance, and Dance Conference”

“Hunting Men”: Migration, Racial Discrimination, and Military Conscription in the Río de la Plata

Posted by Keyanah Freeland, PhD Student Department of History As I noted in my last entry, the Biblioteca Nacional de Uruguay houses a collection of Afro-Uruguayan periodicals spanning the mid-nineteenth century well into the twentieth. For the past few weeks, I have been conducting research there, parsing through the periodicals of the late nineteenth centuryContinue reading ““Hunting Men”: Migration, Racial Discrimination, and Military Conscription in the Río de la Plata”

In Buenos Aires, Neoliberalism Is Performing Again

The stencil on top depicts Jorge Rafael Videla, the head of the first military junta that overthrew Isabel Martínez de Perón in 1976 and initiated the neoliberalization of the country; Carlos Saúl Menem, elected president from 1989 to 1999, widely associated to neoliberal reforms; and current president Mauricio Macri, with the universal recycling symbol, as if they were -andContinue reading “In Buenos Aires, Neoliberalism Is Performing Again”

The Ties that Bind: The Making of Diaspora in the Río de la Plata

Posted by – Keyanah Freeland, PhD Student NYU Department of History   Historically separated and linked by the estuary of the Río de la Plata, the cities of Buenos Aires, Argentina and Montevideo, Uruguay are not often figured as important sites within the historic formation of the African Diaspora within the Americas. Indeed, since theContinue reading “The Ties that Bind: The Making of Diaspora in the Río de la Plata”

Letters from Argentina: Fabricating the Experience of Migration

Posted by Cristina Colmena- PhD Candidate at Spanish and Portuguese Department NYU My project focused on the construction of identities through the correspondence of Spanish migrants who went to Argentina during the 1960´s under Francoism. My point of departure was the letters sent by Purificación Zahino to her family in Spain from 1962 to 1969.Continue reading “Letters from Argentina: Fabricating the Experience of Migration”

When ‘the New’ Conquered Latin America: Newness and Value in the Era of Independence

On Monday, March 2nd, our Spring 2015 Colloquium Lecture Series continues in exploring the topic of Latin American independence through an interdisciplinary lens that includes political history, political theory, and cultural studies. For this second lecture titled “When ‘the New’ Conquered Latin America: Newness and Value in the Era of Independence,” we will be hostingContinue reading “When ‘the New’ Conquered Latin America: Newness and Value in the Era of Independence”

Multiple Forms of Remembering the AMIA

On July 18th, 1994, the Asociación Mutual Israelita Argentina (AMIA) was struck by a van loaded with explosives, resulting in 85 casualties and over 300 injuries. July 18th marks the 20th anniversary of this attack, a date made all the more resonant due to the fact that no one has ever been convicted for theContinue reading “Multiple Forms of Remembering the AMIA”

Cardboard Books and Sexual Work – Part II

On one of my visits to La Sofía Cartonera, a cardboard publisher at the Universidad Nacional de Córdoba in Argentina, I took this picture that shows cardboard book covers that have just been painted and are still wet. The man in the picture is Emiliano Luna, an undergraduate student who told me about the routineContinue reading “Cardboard Books and Sexual Work – Part II”

Exploring State-Civil Society Interactions in Buenos Aires

It is hard to believe how fast my month of research passed. While in Buenos Aires, I worked at a local ANSES office to learn about the effects of Asignacion Universal por Hijo (AUH), a conditional cash transfer, on women’s empowerment. Interviewing recipient women brought me to see that, in many cases, the grant helpsContinue reading “Exploring State-Civil Society Interactions in Buenos Aires”