Tag Archives: Bolivia

CLACS Language Offerings to be Showcased at Orientation

Haitian Tea

On Tuesday, August 25th the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU (CLACS) kicked off the fall 2015 semester with a series of events to welcome a new class of students, and showcase to all NYU students its unique language offerings in Quechua and Haitian Kreyól. As a Title VI National Resource Center designated by the Department of Education, CLACS is part of the Indigenous Language Consortium (with the Institute of Latin American Studies at Columbia University (ILAS), and The Jaime Lucero Mexican Studies Institute at Lehman College) which promotes the education of less commonly taught languages and NYU students can benefit from this unique resource.

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Interacting with Native Quechua Speakers in the North of Potosí, Bolivia

Posted by: Gladys Camacho Rios – MA Candidate at CLACS / Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU

The second part of my fieldwork took place in Toro Toro north of the city of Potosí, Bolivia. After finishing the first part of my fieldwork in Tarabuco, northwest of Sucre, I went back to Cochabamba in order to take a bus to the mountainous town of Toro Toro. It has several tourist attractions like: dinosaur footprints, cave paintings, natural waterfalls, the biggest explored caves in Bolivia, and a big canyon. Most people who live in the town speak Quechua.

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QUECHUA DIALECT IN TARABUCO, BOLIVIA

Posted by: Gladys Camacho Rios – MA Candidate at CLACS / Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU

I have come to Bolivia to gather data in two Quechua-speaking communities: one in the town of Tarabuco northwest of Sucre, and the other in Toro Toro north of the city of Potosí. Specifically, I am interested in doing a post-acoustic analysis of the uvular sound effects in high vowels /i u/ comparing the Quechua dialects of these two communities.

I started in Tarabuco which is the center of the Yampara culture. To get there, I flew to the city of Sucre, the constitutional capital of Bolivia. Tarabuco is located 64 kilometers from Sucre and it is known for its colorful knitted fabrics.
When I got to the community, I looked for Quechua-speaking subjects originally from Tarabuco to record them. I met a young girl, Emiliana, with whom I spoke in Quechua the entire time. She was very friendly and helped me find other Quechua-speaking subjects.

Camacho_Bolivia_Subjects

Recording Quechua speaking people in Tarabuco

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Tata Alfredo Llamk’ayninmanta Parlariwanchik

Bolivian Quechua CLACS NYU Alfredo Quiroz Villarroel Cochabamba Quechua Libros en Quechua Norma del Quechua Boliviano Diccionario Quechua Killachaw punchaw Photo by Juan Carlos Vera Guerra
Kay k’acha podcaspi tata Alfredo Quiroz Villarroel Qhichwa simiwan llamk’ayninmanta parlariwanchik. Pay unaymanta pacha Qhichwa simi qillqakuyta qallarikunanpaq yanapasqa. Chanta UNICEFwanpis llamk’allasqataq. Kunankama pay achkha p’anqataña qillqan: arawikunata, imasmarikunata, novela ñisqatapis, diccionario ñisqakunatapis. May sumaqta tata Alfredo willayninwan kusichiwanchik.
Gladys Camacho Riosqa CLACS-NYUpi Maestríamanta juk yachakuq. Pay kay podcasta Boliviapi, 2015 watapi grabarqa, Qhichwa qutupaq llamk’aqjina.

En este podcast Alfredo Quiroz Villarroel nos habla acerca del trabajo que realizó con el Quechua. Desde hace mucho tiempo el colaboró en el proceso de creación de la norma y estandarización del Quechua en Bolivia. Igualmente trabajó con UNICEF. Tiene muchas obras publicadas: cuentos, adivinanzas, novelas y diccionarios. Muy amenamente nos cuenta en este podcast.
Gladys Camacho Rios es una estudiante de maestría en CLACS-NYU. Ella grabó este podcast en Bolivia en 2015 como miembro del comité de Quechua.

In this podcast Alfredo Villarroel Quiroz tells us about the work he has done with Quechua in Bolivia. Alfredo has collaborated in the processes of creating rules and standardizations of the Quechua language in Bolivia. He has also worked with UNICEF. Alfredo also talks to us about the many books he has published of stories, riddles, novels and dictionaries. Take a listen!
Gladys Camacho Rios is an MA student at CLACS-NYU. She recorded this podcast in Bolivia in 2015 as member of the Quechua Outreach Committee.


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Nestorwan Gladyswan Cochabambapi Qhichwa Simi Yacharachikuchkasqanmanta Ch’aqwarinku

Nestor Negretty Cochabamba Bolivia Quechua Laboratorio de Lenguas Enseñanza del Quechua CLACS NYU Rimasun Néstor Negretty Lingüista, Quchapampa-Boliviamanta. Kunan p’unchawpiqa Qhichwa yachachiqjina Laboratorio de Lenguas ñisqapi, San Simón jatun yachaywasipi llamk’achkan. Chantapis pay Asamblea Departamental ñisqapi Kastilla simimanta Qhichwa simiman jatuchaq kamachiykunata tiqraspa llamk’allarqataq. Néstorwan Gladyswan, Bolivia suyup yachaywasikunanpi, imaynatachus Qhichwa simita kunan p’unchaw yachachichkanku chanta yachakuchkasqanku ima chaymanta ch’aqwarinku. Néstor astawan kallpachana ñin, manasina allintachu thatkichan ñin. Jinallamantataq Bolivia suyupi qhichwa simipaq kamachiy apaykachakuchkasqanmantapis ch’aqwarillankutaq.
Gladys Camacho Riosqa CLACS-NYUpi Maestríamanta juk yachakuq. Pay kay podcasta Boliviapi, 2014 watapi grabarqa, imaptinchus pay karusuyumantapacha Rimasunpaq llamk’achkarpa.

Néstor Negretty es lingüista de Cochabamba-Bolivia, actualmente es profesor de Quechua en el Laboratorio de Lenguas de la Universidad Mayor de San Simón. Ha trabajado en la Asamblea departamental como traductor de los estatutos orgánicos del español al quechua. Néstor y Gladys conversan sobre el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje del Quechua en las distintas unidades educativas en Cochabamba y Bolivia. Néstor indica que hay que mejorar en el proceso ya que actualmente no está siendo efectiva. Así mismo discuten la implementación de la Norma del Quechua en Bolivia.
Gladys Camacho Rios es una estudiante de maestría en CLACS-NYU. Ella grabó este podcast en Bolivia en 2014 como correspondiente internacional de Rimasun.

Nestor Negretty is a linguist from Cochabamba, Bolivia. Currently, he teaches Quechua at the Center for Language Teaching at San Simon University. He previously worked at the departmental assembly as a translator, translating the law statutes from Spanish into Quechua. In this podcast, Nestor and Gladys talk about the Quechua teaching and learning processes in different educational centers in Cochabamba and across Bolivia. They also discuss the recent implementation of the Quechua language norms in Bolivia.
Gladys Camacho Rios is an MA student at CLACS-NYU. She recorded this podcast in Bolivia in 2014 as international correspondent of Rimasun.


Subscribe to Rimasun via iTunes or via another podcast service
Suscríbete a Rimasun a través de iTunes o a través de otro servicio de podcast
Download this episode (right click, save link as…) / Guarda este episodio

An Alternative Narrative of Development

Photo by Jose Raul Guzman

Photo by José Raúl Guzmán

In his address to the United Nations General Assembly, Bolivian President Evo Morales called for a more inclusive “people-centric” global development agenda that included acquiring control of natural resources for the benefit of all. The day before, CLACS students and guests heard a very different story about the Morales government’s inclusion of indigenous groups in Bolivia’s economic development from 5 indigenous Bolivian women and one ally as part of the “Dialogue on Indigenous Rights: The Issues of Autonomy and Consultation in the Plurinational State of Bolivia” event held in the King Juan Carlos Center.

Organized by CLACS professor Pamela Calla, the women, Nilda Rojas Huanka, Toribia Lero Quispe, Clara Victoria Ramos Aillón, Judith Rivero, Wilma Mendoza, and Sarela Paz, representing indigenous groups from across Bolivia, came to CLACS prior to their attendance at the United Nations Indigenous Peoples World Conference. Each woman spoke on a different element of indigenous relationships with the Morales government and economic development including the lack of environmental protections, the preeminence of laws that protect the mining industry over constitutional safeguards for indigenous rights, and the political co-option and subversion of the alliance between CIDOB and CONAMAQ—the two largest confederations of indigenous governing bodies in Bolivia.

Each of these moving testimonials revealed the challenges that remain for indigenous groups in Bolivia. In a country that adopted a new constitution in 2009 and declared itself “plurinational” in order to promote increased autonomy for its indigenous groups, the women told how these rights have been rolled back or overridden in the following years. The question remained whether the plurinational government of Bolivia could be inclusive while developing the country’s economy and resources.

One of the persistent threads in each presentation was the need to have indigenous voices heard in the Bolivian legislature and public and, where that is not possible, to raise consciousness on an international scale. Through our academic work and community events, NYU’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies seeks to give a platform for voices that would otherwise go unheard.

Photo by Jose Raul Guzman

Photo by José Raúl Guzmán

Find out more about the work going on at CLACS and our events here.

Posted by CLACS-MA student Patrick Moreno-Covington.

Tata Juan Coronado Qhichwa Kawsaymanta UNIBOLpi Yachachishasqa


UNIBOL Bolivia Quechua Podcast Chimoré Cultural de la Nación Tata Juan Coronado Mojocoya-Zudañez provincia jap’iypi, Chuquisaca-Boliviapi paqarisqa. Payqa Qhichwa Casimiro Huanca (UNIBOL) jatun yachaywasipi yachachiq. Pay “Qhichwa kawsaymanta” yachachin. Astawanpis Qhichwallapi parlaspa yachachin, wakin kutitaq kastilla simipipis parlasqanmanta ch’uwanchaykurispa. Kay clasepiqa “Filosofía amaútica” tawantinsuyu chhiqapi kawsaymanta t’ukunku. Jinallamantataq Calendario Tradicionalmantapis ch’aqwarillankutaq. Paykunapaqqa kay Calendarioqa tata intip chanta mama killap kuyuyninmanjina llamk’aq kasqa. Chantapis Chakanaman jinaqa tawa jatun raymikuna karqa ñinku. Chaykunata qhawarispataq, yachachiq Juanpa clasekunanqa mana teoríallachu, ruwaspa rikuchiypis kallantaq. Yachakuqkunaqa jatun yachaywasi ukhup chaqran patapi may sumaqta ruwaspa yacharikunku.
Gladys Camacho Riosqa CLACS-NYUpi Maestríamanta juk yachakuq. Pay kay podcasta Boliviapi, 2014 watapi grabarqa, imaptinchus pay karusuyumantapacha Rimasunpaq llamk’achkarpa.

Juan Coronado nació en Mojocoya-Provincia Zudañez, Chuquisaca-Bolivia. Es docente en la Universidad Indígena Quechua Casimiro Huanca (UNIBOL), en Chimoré- Bolivia. Dicta la materia de “Cultura de la Nación Quechua.” Sus clases son impartidas mayormente en Quechua sin embargo también facilita aclaraciones en español. En la materia se reflexiona sobre la filosofía amaútica de la cultura andina. De igual forma se discuten los temas del calendario tradicional que estaban basados en el movimiento del sol y la luna. Enfatizan que en la cultura quechua existían 4 fiestas tradicionales de acuerdo a la Chakana. Las clases impartidas por el docente no solo son teóricas sino también prácticas. Los estudiantes realizan dramatizaciones en los sembradíos del campus universitario.
Gladys Camacho Rios es una estudiante de maestría en CLACS-NYU. Ella grabó este podcast en Bolivia en 2014 como correspondiente internacional de Rimasun.

Juan Coronado was born in Mojocoya community in Zudañez province, Chuquisaca-Bolivia. He is a lecturer at the Casimiro Huanca Quechua Indigenous University, in Chimoré-Bolivia. He teaches a course titled “Culture of the Quechua Nation.” Classes are taught in the Quechua language, however he also answers some question in Spanish. The course presents the philosophies of the wise elders of Andean cultures. It also discusses the traditional calendar, which was based in the movement of the sun and the moon, and emphasizes the four traditional fiestas of the Chakana found in Quechua cultures. Coronado’s classes deal not only with theories, but also with practices. Students also enact dramatic performances in the fields of the university campus.
Gladys Camacho Rios is an MA student at CLACS-NYU. She recorded this podcast in Bolivia in 2014 as international correspondent of Rimasun.


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