Welcoming our 2020 CLACS Teaching Fellows Program Cohort

by Marchita Primavera, CLACS MA Candidate On Saturday, September 12, the 2020 Teaching Fellows cohort held its first meeting of the year-long program, and we are excited to report that it was a success. The virtual meeting was attended by ten K-12 educators of diverse disciplines (history, language, and math), and various grade levels, whoContinue reading “Welcoming our 2020 CLACS Teaching Fellows Program Cohort”

Recap – Boyhood and Masculinity in Contemporary Guyanese Film (2/3)

On February 3rd, CLACS began its Spring programing with the event Boyhood and Masculinity in Contemporary Guyanese Film. The event co-sponsored by the Department of Art & Public Policy at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, featured screenings of Gavin Ramoutar’s short film, Antiman, as well as Mason Richards’ short film The Seawall. In Ramoutar’sContinue reading “Recap – Boyhood and Masculinity in Contemporary Guyanese Film (2/3)”

Upcoming Events November 6-11, 2017

CLACS has yet another jam-packed week of events for you to attend, engange with, reflect on, and enjoy. If you are unable to attend the event in person, check out our facebook page, because there is a good chance that there will be a live-stream. This week, events range from critically analyzing the aftermath of hurricanesContinue reading “Upcoming Events November 6-11, 2017”

Upcoming Event: The Importance of the Mother Tongue in Children’s Literature in the Caribbean

Mother Tongues United is an event organized by CLACS in partnership with  The Haitian Creole Language Institute of New York (HCLI) and Port Academie to bring together educators, authors, and activists from different language communities to discuss the importance of the use of the Mother Tongue in Children’s Literature in the Caribbean. At the center ofContinue reading “Upcoming Event: The Importance of the Mother Tongue in Children’s Literature in the Caribbean”

Anti-Imperial Imperialism as a Revolutionary Model?

Written by CLACS MA student Michael Cary. Last Monday marked the second installment of the Spring 2016 Colloquium Series. CLACS was happy to receive Joshua Simon of Columbia University, who gave us a preview of his upcoming book. In a lecture titled “The Ideology of Creole Revolution: Imperialism and Independence in American and Latin AmericanContinue reading “Anti-Imperial Imperialism as a Revolutionary Model?”

Prof. Katherine Smith’s Presentation on Haitian Freemasons at the 40th Annual CSA Conference

On May 25th, Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow Katherine Smith presented her research on Haitian Freemasonry at the 40th Annual Caribbean Studies Association Conference in New Orleans. The Freemasons claim historical roots in medieval stone masonry guilds of Europe and mythological origins in the construction of the Egyptian pyramids. However, the organization, as it is known today, descendsContinue reading “Prof. Katherine Smith’s Presentation on Haitian Freemasons at the 40th Annual CSA Conference”

Seeing the Change: La Fábrica in Havana

Posted by Nicki Fleischner- MA Candidate at CLACS/ Global Journalism at NYU  When we arrived there is already a line snaking its way around the block: Cuban girls in heels, boys in gold chains and brightly printed graphic tees, foreign tourists or exchange students sprinkled throughout. At the door a few groups try to greaseContinue reading “Seeing the Change: La Fábrica in Havana”

Aponte and His World Conference Dives into A Radical Vision of Slave Uprising

Written by CLACS MA Candidate Constanza Ontaneda Rehman-Khedker Coming soon, on Friday May 8th and Saturday May 9th, NYU will be proud to host a one-of-a-kind two-day conference centered on the leader of the 1811-1812 massive slave rebellion in Cuba. “José Antonio Aponte. José Antonio Aponte and His World: Writing, Painting, and Making Freedom in theContinue reading “Aponte and His World Conference Dives into A Radical Vision of Slave Uprising”

What can pineapples tell us about identity?

Originally posted on NYU Food Studies Puerto Rico:
In today’s visits to Atenas Pineapple, the commercial-scale pineapple farm, and Hacienda La Esperanza, the slavery-based sugar plantation turned nature preserve, the question of Puerto Rican identity and its relationship to the Commonwealth’s agricultural and economic goals stood out to me – how are they intertwined? How…

When ‘the New’ Conquered Latin America: Newness and Value in the Era of Independence

On Monday, March 2nd, our Spring 2015 Colloquium Lecture Series continues in exploring the topic of Latin American independence through an interdisciplinary lens that includes political history, political theory, and cultural studies. For this second lecture titled “When ‘the New’ Conquered Latin America: Newness and Value in the Era of Independence,” we will be hostingContinue reading “When ‘the New’ Conquered Latin America: Newness and Value in the Era of Independence”