Tag Archives: CLACS

El Salvador Accords 2016 Conference Videos and Transcripts Now Available

Link to Videos and Transcripts

A year in the making on Spring 2016, NYU’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) and Columbia’s Institute of Latin American Studies (ILAS) presented “From War to Politics: An International Conference on El Salvador’s Peace Process.” This was a remarkable convening of stakeholders in the signing of the peace accords that ended the civil war in El Salvador. The conference, which was sponsored by various institutions including the Department of History at NYU, the Office of the Provost at NYU and Columbia University, provided the opportunity for a candid public conversation between sometimes opposing parties and regional players in the war and to reflect about the conflict, share insights about the historic resolution and explore the current consequences in El Salvador of the vestiges of war.

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Almost a year after the three-day gathering that included 20 participants, the full videos that were live streamed worldwide at the time and the transcriptions of those conversations are available for all to see and explore through this link. We understand these documents to be sources for a new understanding of the process and a contribution on scholarship in topics such as History of the Americas, the Cold War, Conflict Resolution, International Relations, Human Rights, among many others.

Special thanks to Will Hogue of Fordham University and CLACS Graduate Assistants Michael Cary and Diego Cristian Saldaña for their work in these efforts.

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Imadi kan kichwa warmikuna?

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Kay podcastpi parlarikanchik runa warmikuna imada rurashkada kikin kunaq yuyayda p’akta chingabuk.

En este podcast, hablamos con Mirian sobre cómo las mujeres indígenas trabajan para alcanzar sus sueños.

In this podcast, we speak with Mirian on how indigenous woman strive to reach their goals.

Jony Hernan Prudencio Parlan Gerardo Huaracha Huarachawan Historiata Yanquemanta

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Gerardo Huaracha Huaracha museoyoq kan Yanque llaqtapi, Valle del Colcapi, Arequipa, Peru. Gerardoq taytan wasichakuran, ña huk pachaq iskay chunka watakunamantaña. Chay wasipi museo kaq ichaqa qayna Agosto killapi, 2016pi, hatun pachakuyuy chayta thunichiran. Kay podcastpi, grabasqa qayna Mayopi, Jony Hernan Prudencio, wayna Tuti llaqtamanta, tayta Gerardowan parlashan museonmanta.

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Tayta Gerardo takes Jony on a tour through his museum in Yanque.

Gerardo Huaracha Huaracha tiene un Museo en el Valle del Colca en Arequipa, Peru. El padre de Gerardo construyó la casa él mismo, hace más de ciento veinte años. En esta casa solía ser un museo pero el Agosto pasado, en el 2016, un terremoto la derrumbó. En este podcast, grabado en el mes de Mayo, Jony Hernan Prudencio, un joven del pueblo de Tuti, habla con el tayta Gerardo sobre el museo.

Gerardo Huaracha Huaracha has a Museum in the Town of Yanque, in the Colca Valley in Arequipa, Peru. Gerardo’s father built the house himself, more than a hundred and twenty years ago. This house used to be a Museum but last August, in 2016, an earthquake knocked it over. In this podcast, recorded in the month of May, Jony Hernan Prudencio, a young man from the town of Tuti, talks to tayta Gerardo about the museum.

New Yorkpi, Tayta Paypa Ususin ima Runasimimanta Rimashanku

rimasun quechua passing down CLACS NYU

Kay podcastpi, huk tayta paypa ususin ima runasimimanta rimashanku. Paykuna Perumanta kanku, ichaqa ña wakin watakunaña New Yorkpi tishanku. Tayta runasimita rimayta atin, ichaqa paypa ususin mana atinchu. Paykuna imaraykumanta rimashanku.

En este podcast, un padre y su hija hablan sobre su uso del idioma quechua. Son del Perú, pero ya desde hace unos años viven en Nueva York. El padre puede hablar en quechua, pero su hija no, y conversan sobre esta realidad que viven a diario.

In this podcast, a father and his daughter speak about Quechua language use in their family. They are from Peru, but have lived in New York for many years. The father can speak in Quechua, but the daughter cannot; together they reflect on this reality.

‘Proximities/Distances’: Theatre, Performance, and Dance Conference

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Creators and performers from all over Latin America and Spain will converge at the King Juan Carlos Center (KJCC) next week for ‘Proximities/Distances’, a two-day event that will explore ideas and practices of proximity and distance in contemporary Spanish and Latin American theatre, performance and dance.

Drawing on the current interest in relational strategies and investigating the connections between art and audiences, the aesthetic and the socio-political, it will examine a diverse range of dramaturgies that bring these different media into contact.

The event is curated by Cristina Colmena (PhD Candidate, NYU Spanish Department) and Ana Sánchez Acevedo (PhD Candidate, CUNY Graduate Center). Participants will include La Phármaco (Spain), MAPA Teatro (Colombia), Íntegro (Peru), Claudio Tolcachir (Argentina), Daniel Salguero (Colombia), Pablo Remón (Spain), Alejandro Moreno (Chile), Arantxa Araujo (Mexico), David Espinosa (Spain), and more.

Please join us Tuesday, September 27 and Wednesday, September 28 at the KJCC Auditorium for this wonderful gathering of Latin American and Spanish creators and performers!

CLACS Welcomes Chilean Author José Ignacio Valenzuela in First U.S. Book Tour Presenting ‘Trilogía del Malamor y Malaluna’

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The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) in collaboration with the Embassy of Chile proudly invites you to join author José Ignacio Valenzuela in his first U.S. tour presenting Trilogy Malamor and its prequel Malaluna on Monday, September 26th at the KJCC Auditorium.

Trilogía del Malamor is a wildly successful trilogy by José Ignacio Valenzuela and is considered the first fantasy series of Latin America. Composed of the books “Hasta el fin del mundo”, “La raíz del mal” and “El árbol de la vida,” this wonderful series full of adventure, romance, enigmas and suspense delights and surprises readers with endearing characters and an unexpected ending. Set in the small mysterious town of Almahue, meaning “place of phantoms” in the Mapuche language, at the edge of the cold sea of Patagonia, it is a place where magic and fantasy abounds and where the desire to love can kill.

Malaluna is a prequel to the series released at the end of last year. Since its release it has captivated fans and new readers by recounting the previous and unknown story of the characters that give life to the Malamor saga. Valenzuela recently sold the film rights to the trilogy, so a film version of this magical story is pending.

José Ignacio Valenzuela has a vast career as an author and screenwriter for film and television in Chile, Mexico, Puerto Rico and the United States. He has published a number of novels and short fiction, and has also served as professor and instructor of creative writing.

CLACS has also invited Ángeles Donoso Macaya, Associate Professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College and expert in contemporary Latin American literature, and Chilean author Carlos Labbé. The panelists will discuss the writing of the trilogy, its reception in Latin America, the upcoming films, and more generally, the development of contemporary young adult literature in the region.

The books of the Malamor trilogy will be on sale at the event. The event will be held in Spanish and it is free and open to the public.

Please join CLACS and the Embassy of Chile in celebrating Chilean literature and José Ignacio Valenzuela’s work by joining us on September 26 at 6:30 p.m. at the KJCC Auditorium.

 

CLACS 50th Inaugural Event: Engaging Latin America, Building Democracy

Layout 1The year the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies’ (CLACS) celebrates its golden anniversary. Every significant milestone deserves reflection. In honor of our 50th year of existence, we revisited our department’s history.

The early history of the department is inextricably tied to its founding director, the gregarious Dr. Kalman Silvert. A political scientist and first-rate scholar of Latin America, he was tasked with helping to craft the early vision of NYU’s Ibero-American Language and Area Center (IALAC) under Dean George Winchester Stone Jr.

At the time of his directorship, Kalman Silvert also worked as Social Science Advisor to the Ford Foundation. Prior to his arrival at NYU he served as the first president of the Latin-American Studies Association (LASA). Silvert was instrumental in shaping an early model of internationally focused interdisciplinary studies and in helping to shape a community of regional experts in New York City. One of Silvert’s lasting legacies is his commitment to promoting scholarship, education and democratic society.

Today our center is greatly informed by this early commitment to democracy and intellectual rigor within Latin American and Caribbean Studies and it is reflected in the rich diversity of our students, exceptional language courses, community relationships, events, and scholarship.

It is in the spirit of celebrating our history and the contributions of Latin Americanists like Dr. Kalman Silvert that we  invite the entire NYU and CLACS community to help kick off the celebration of  our golden anniversary with our 50th Anniversary Inaugural Reception and Book Presentation this Friday, September 16th.

We will feature four Latin Americanists that will discuss the legacy of political scientist and CLACS founding director Kalman H. Silvert. We have invited important scholars Jorge Balán, Abraham F. Lowenthal, Chris Mitchell, Martin Weinstein to discuss the recently published book “Kalman Silvert: Engaging Latin America, Building Democracy.”

The book presentation will be preceded by the CLACS 50th Anniversary Inaugural Reception at 4:30pm. This event is free and open to the public. Please join us this upcoming Friday to kick off our celebration of CLACS 50th Anniversary!