Tag Archives: Ecuador

Imadi kan kichwa warmikuna?

Mirian_family

Kay podcastpi parlarikanchik runa warmikuna imada rurashkada kikin kunaq yuyayda p’akta chingabuk.

En este podcast, hablamos con Mirian sobre cómo las mujeres indígenas trabajan para alcanzar sus sueños.

In this podcast, we speak with Mirian on how indigenous woman strive to reach their goals.

Quechua/Kichwa Film Showcase on the Road

From June 17th to the 19th the Quechua/Kichwa film showcase May Sumak! (How Beautiful!) is going on the road  to Washington, D.C. The showcase is a celebration of indigenous and community filmmaking in the Quechua languages spoken throughout the Andes and by immigrants in the United States. Created in 2015 by the CLACS student-led Runasimi Outreach Committee (ROC), May Sumak! will be part of the National Museum of the American Indian’s ongoing exhibition The Great Inka Road The opening night will feature the film Killa  and Q&A with its director  Ecuadorian filmmaker Alberto Muenala. This conversation will be hosted by CLACS alum and former ROC member Charlie Uruchima. Click here for more details on the films, show times and venues.

maysumak ifle invite

Andean Culture Night

Last night we celebrated Andean culture at the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center. The Runasimi Outreach Committee and Center for Latin American Studies hosted various community groups and artists representing Ecuador, Perú and Bolivia for the last Quechua night of the year.

Participants included:

Ñukanchik Llakta Wawakuna dancing Kawsay La Vida and reading a poem

Grupo Folklorico Fuerza Peruana dancing Huaylas de Carnaval

Baila Perú New York dancing Marinera from Trujillo

Odi Gonzales reading from the poetry collection Virgenes Urbanas

Pachamama dancing Tinkus

Eduardo F. Medrano Salas reading poetry

Fraternidad Cultural Pasión Boliviano dancing Salaque

Thanks so much to all our participants and everyone else who came out to share this special night with us. We enjoyed Salteñas and Api and two hours of performances! On behalf of the Runasimi Outreach Committee we hope to see you next year.

 

Inti Raymi: Reciprocity and Anti-Colonial Symbolism

Posted by Dusty Christensen – MA Candidate at CLACS / Global Journalism at NYU

Christensen – Ecuador – IntiRaymi

Inti Raymi festivities in the village of San Roque (Photo by Dustin Christensen)

For many indigenous residents of the Andes, the Inti Raymi festival is one of the most important celebrations of the year. Celebrating the summer solstice, this festival has its origins firmly rooted in pre-Colombian times. In Cotacachi, Ecuador, where I conducted my summer research, this was the most important festival of the year. Members of the 40 something indigenous communities surrounding Cotacachi dance house-to-house in the nights preceding the festival. Then, for several days, they gather and dance down to the town’s central plaza, where they dance, sing, play music, drink, and occasionally engage in violent confrontations with other communities.

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Communal Workdays in the Andes

Posted by Dusty Christensen – MA Candidate at CLACS / Global Journalism at NYU

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Kichwa men in the village of Turuku digging a ditch for a water pipe as part of a communal work day known as a minga. (Photo by Dusty Christensen)

Early in the morning, before the daily summer winds start to howl, the music comes blaring out of the church loudspeaker. The guitars, charangos and flutes carry across the village of Turuku, waking everyone who wasn’t already out in the fields. Though the announcement won’t come for another hour, everyone knows what the wake-up call is for — today is a communal work day.

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Alberto Anrango, the president of the indigenous village of Turuku, announcing the minga over the village loudspeakers. (Photo by Dusty Christensen)

At 7 o’clock — an hour after the music has started — community President Alberto Anrango pics up the mic and begins his impromptu speech. “Ladies and gentlemen,” he begins in Kichwa, his voice crackling over the old speakers mounted on top of the chapel roof. “Don’t forget that today is the minga.” He urges everyone to bring pickaxes and shovels, and warns that those skipping today will be fined by the village government.

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Runakunapak Yuyaykuna Mamallaktakunapak Tandanakuy Wasibi

Rimasun Quechua language podcast series NYU CLACS NYC Kichwa Salasaca Ecuador United Nations

Photo: Ben Powless.

Mirian Masaquiza, kichwa warmi Ecuadormamallaktamanda, llankan Secretaría del Foro Permanente para las Cuestiones Indígenas nishkabi Mamallaktakunapak Tandanakuy Wasibi (ONU). Mirian rimagun ONU wasi Foro Permanente uku rurashkada runakunada sinchiyachigu. Shinalladik, kichwa shimida rimananin runa yuyay, kawsay kunada sinchiyachingu.

Mirian Masaquiza, kichwa del Ecuador trabaja en la Secretaría del Foro Permanente para las Cuestiones Indígenas de las Naciones Unidas. Mirian nos platica sobre los avances en Naciones Unidas sobre los derechos de los pueblos indígenas, en particular el papel del Foro Permanente para las Cuestiones Indígenas. Asimismo, alienta ha que se hable el kichwa como una forma de mantener su identidad y cultura.

Mirian Masaquiza, kichwa from Ecuador is a staff member of the UN Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. Mirian shares some of the advancements at the United Nations on indigenous peoples’ issues, in particular the role of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. She also encourages to speak Kichwa as a way to maintain her identity and culture.


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Angel Tibán Guala Riman Llank’anan TVpi


Rimasun - MICC TV - EcuadorAngel Tibán Guala Ecuador Mamallaktapi – Cotopaxi marcamanta Tv MICC canal 47 jayllita pushan. Kay rikuna willanaka “Movimiento Indígena y Campesino de Cotopaxi – MICC” tantanakuypakmi kan. Ñami kinsa yalli watakuna kari warmikunapak yuyaykunata kausaykunatapash ishkayshimipi rimashpa rikuchishpapash llankankuna.Cay rikuna jayllika chusku markakunapak wasikunamanmi yaykun.

Angel Tibán Guala dirige la televisora comunitaria Tv MICC canal 47. El Movimiento Indígena y Campesino de Cotopaxi – MICC es el propietario del medio de comunicación. El canal viene funcionando más de tres años, mostrando las voces y la identidad propia de los Pueblos y Nacionalidades Indígenas del Ecuador. El canal de televisión ingresa a los hogares de cuatro provincias de zona central del Ecuador.

Angel Tibán Guala is the Director of the community television channel MICC 47, which is owned by El Movimiento Indígena y Campesino de Cotopaxi (MICC). For more than three years, the channel has facilitated the Indigenous Nations and Peoples of Ecuador to transmit their own voices and identity into the homes of residents in four provinces in central Ecuador.

Christine Mladic interviewed Angel during his visit to the United Nations in NYC.


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Suscríbete a Rimasun a través de iTunes o a través de otro servicio de podcast
Download this episode (right click, save link as…) / Guarda este episodio

Bonus Track: Malayerba y la dramaturgia colectiva

No quería dejar pasar la oportunidad de postear sobre una grata sorpresa que me trajo mi viaje de investigación durante el verano. Aunque la generosa beca Tinker solamente pudo cubrir mi viaje a Lima y Bogotá, quiso la casualidad que el tercer país que anhelaba visitar viniera a mí. Gracias a coordinaciones con dos amigos teatreros peruanos, Lucero Medina y Michael Joan Gómez, y al Grupo Panparamayo Teatro, tuve la oportunidad de formar parte del taller de teatro “Memoria y olvido en la acción dramática”, ofrecido por el grupo Malayerba, de Quito, Ecuador. Dos de los miembros fundadores de este emblemático grupo, Arístides Vargas y Charo Francés, fueron hasta Lima a compartir su conocimiento y su pasión por la creación colectiva. Continue reading

Participant Observation at Casa Trans

Over the past year I have been keeping track of the work of a group called Casa Trans (Trans House) based in Quito, Ecuador. Casa Trans is both a home for LGBT activists and a political and cultural center where events and meetings are held on a regular basis.  Providing safe and affordable housing to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and especially transgender activist is an important factor that contributes to the vitality of the organization because many of its members experience housing discrimination. Casa Trans was formed in response to the murder of a transgender activist in 2004.  The members identify themselves as Transfeministas (transfeminists); they embrace the legacy and history of the feminist movement as their own and see themselves as working to expand the scope of feminism.  Casa Trans works on various different projects and campaigns at any given time, but their mainstay is as group in defense of the gender and sexual rights of Ecuadorians.  They are resolutely in support of women’s right to choose in a political climate where abortion is a relentlessly controversial topic and many LGBT organizations have refused to weigh in on the topic.  Casa Trans is the first LGBT organization in Ecuador that has sought out transgender men and made them part of their organizing efforts.  They affirm that some women have penises and some men have vaginas, and thereby refuse a biologist gender binary.  One of the members I interviewed said that she is not interested in being identified solely as woman because the term trans marks her experience of transitioning from one gender to another.  This is a remarkable contrast from more common approaches to transgender identity as a pathological disease, or a case of being trapped in the wrongly gendered body.

Garriga - Ecuador - Todos somos

Sign reads “We are all whores”

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“Racism Does Exist – But I Have Never Experienced It”

I came to Spain to better understand the Ecuadorian immigrant experience in regards to racism and discrimination.  What I found was that racism does exist in Spain and it is apparent in the laws and policies constituted by the Spanish government.  While these laws and policies directly affect Ecuadorian immigrants, the Ecuadorian immigrants that I spoke with were not very open in discussing their own experiences of racism.  Many believed that racism was a problem in Spain, but didn’t recount personal experiences of it.  Often, when racism was discussed, people spoke of the racist government and policies that have been making things difficult for them as immigrants, yet racism was rarely used to describe experiences with these policies.

Ecuadorian immigrants spoke of the immigration policies implemented by the newest president that have made it difficult for them to become citizens.  Some even referred to these policies as “racist,” yet others did not equate the policies as a personal experience of racism, even when they were being directly affected.  One immigrant had been waiting a year since he filed papers to become a Spanish citizen.  He stated that before the economic crisis, it only took a year to complete the process and it was very easy, but now, it could take twice as long.  Despite the policies directly affecting him, he did not seem to think that this was a racist or anti-immigrant issue.

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Police inside a Metro Station

Another policy that was heavily discussed among Ecuadorian immigrants was the policy of police checking papers and legal statuses of anyone in the country.  While the police have the right to check anyone’s papers, they have been known to mainly check those of racial minorities.  One immigrant said that the police would never check the papers of a “rubia,” but that they often ask immigrants for their documentation.  While this immigrant seemed to deny that Spain was a racist country despite his own experience of being asked for his papers, he referred to the police asking for documentation as “racism.” Continue reading