Tag Archives: education

Gladyswan Andreswan

Cochabamba, Bolivia. Photo by Favio Antezana, CC 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/fachoantezana/25702852731/

Kay rimaypi Chimore llaqtapi Gladyswan tata Renewan parlarichkanku. Ñawpaqtaqa tata rene pichus kasqanta riqsirichikun. Chantaqa imatachus chay UNIBOL jatun yachay wasipi yachachisqanmanta parlarin, astawampis ñawpaq yuyaykuna mana chinkananmanta. Chantataq ima pachapichus sach’a k’utunamanta parlaspa tukuchin.

En este diálogo Gladys y don Rene están conversando en Chimoré, un pueblo en Bolivia central. Primero, don Rene da a conocer su biografía. Luego, habla sobre lo que enseña en la Universidad Indígena Boliviana (UNIBOL), sobre todo, que no debe perderse los saberes ancestrales. Y, termina, hablando sobre la época en la que se puede cortar árboles; ya que, de acuerdo a la cosmovisión quechua para que la madera sea duradera. Los árboles se pueden cortar cuando estos estén maduros, por el mes de marzo, y no cuando estén retoñando, por el mes de agosto.

In this conversation Gladys Camacho Ríos is talking with Don Rene in Chimoré, a town in central Bolivia. First, Rene shares his personal story. Later, he talks about what he learned at the Indigenous University of Bolivia (UNIBOL), above all, that it is important not to lose ancestral knowledge. And he ends talking about when one can cut trees, according to Quechua cosmovision, so that the wood is durable.  The trees can be cut when they are mature, in March, and when they are not sprouting, by August.

Warisata en Imágenes: The Right to an Emancipatory Education

 

09-19 Event Picture (Warista en Imagens).JPG

¡Paulo Freire Vive!

The Right to an Emancipatory Education, at Risk in Latin America and the Caribbean

Discussion and photographic exposition of Warisata: the experience of the indigenous “escuela núcleo” in Bolivia.

September 19, 2017

The Ayllu School of Warisata in Bolivia, despite its short operative life (1931-1940), has been one of the most significant educational experiences in Latin America and the Caribbean. Transmitting the principles of freedom, solidarity, and reciprocity, it reevaluated the Bolivian cultural identity and sustainable communal production in harmony with mother earth.

The experience and exhibition of Warisata en Imágenes discussed the current Latin American and Caribbean context and the challenging task of creating an emancipatory education. Moreover, the conversation was geared towards the philosophical motivations—and the ends—of education as a tool for personal growth and social progress.

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Museum Education in ‘La Llajta’

Posted by Arlean Dawes – MA Candidate at CLACS /Museum Studies Concentration at NYU

Cochabamba, the third largest city in Bolivia is affectionately referred to as ‘La Llajta’ which in the Quechua language means community or town. The name Cochabamba itself also derives from Quechua. La llajta has become my second home over the past several years and this summer it is serving as my base for field research. As a CLACS student with a concentration in Museum Studies, my experience is rather unique in that I get the opportunity to work within a museum here in Cochabamba and apply certain themes from my thesis to the projects I am heading up at the museum INIAM.

When I initially arrived at INIAM (Anthropological Research Institute and Archaeological Museum), I immediately got started on creating educational materials with Sr. René Machado, the director of the interactive program at the museum. This program was designed by Sr. Machado several years ago with the intention of providing the opportunity for school students to not only have a regular visit touring the museum and seeing artifacts, but rather experience and interact with the collection through activities such as an archaeological excavation, analyzing the Pre-Columbian products found today among the various Bolivian regions and climates. Within my first week in the museum we had planned more or less what we wanted to include in the first 3 doblados and had finished a rough draft of the first two.

The materials and ‘doblados’ or educational foldables are based on six themes which are covered throughout the interactive program—fossilization, migration, stratigraphy and ecological conservation, large civilizations in Bolivian territory, Pre-Columbian agricultural products, and cave art. These foldable will be used to complement the interactive program school children participate in when they visit, however what about schools that are located too far from the city to send their children and don’t have easy access to the museum?

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Rescuing Historical Memory in El Salvador

 

Memorial at El Mozote

How can the Salvadoran community rescue historical memory when there is such a divide in national/political identity? Focusing on how historical memory post civil war has affected the post-war generation, one begins to realize there has not been a clear practice to create historical memory in El Salvador.

The governing party that held power after the civil war ended, ARENA, made neither an effort to preserve the memory of the civil war, nor have a dialogue about what occurred during that time. Since the left-wing FMLN party came into power with the election of Mauricio Funes in 2009, the same issues have remained. The government has failed to integrate education about the war into school nation-wide, and teachers are not required to discuss in the classroom what happened during the civil war. However, there is a program in which the government provides transportation for students throughout the country to visit museums, whether regarding the civil war or not, in order to promote historical memory.

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Newcomers in New York: The Interview Sessions

Rosanna-Nayanna_Interview

In keeping align with my methodological approach utilizing multimedia to conduct collaborative ethnography; the latest installments of the project were interview workshops.  In general, skill development workshops are a major component of this project.  The workshops focus on creative reconnaissance and technological skill building activities.  The participants and I work together (and with local experts) to learn more about different aspects of photography, video, and audio equipment and techniques, editing programs, blogging, creative writing, and more.  Furthermore, another purpose of the meetings and workshops is to familiarize the participants with the greater New York City area.

Last week, I met with the young ladies, in groups of two, at Washington Square in Manhattan. Throughout the day, each participant was able to enter and observe New York University’s Bobst Library (where they were granted limited access to the stacks and facility!), the Tisch School of Art’s ITP lab (the Interactive Telecommunications Program, where we borrow the 5D camera and audio recording equipment), and the CLACS office and rooms (the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, where the footage was actually recorded).  Each pair played artistic directors in setting the stage for their interview session. Unfortunately, a light decided to begin its slow, blinking decline during the “talk show” style interview, but the cameras kept rolling in order to maintain the “flow” of the conversation.  Claritza and Valin decided that a conversation style would be the most comfortable and effective approach.  Continue reading

Estudia y DESOBDC: the Higher Education Debate in Colombia

McLoughlin - Colombia - Graffiti

“Study and Disobey,” graffiti from the Plaza de Bolivar

I wasn’t in Bogotá for last year’s spate of student strikes and protests, nor have I seen its student movement in action. Its wake, however, is everywhere.

The graffiti doesn’t last long in the ritzier areas of the city. It’s wiped off advertisements rather quickly; the pretty woman declaring her desire to “estudiar” from the wall of the bus stop by my hostel was, by morning, yearning once more for the “solidez” of the cell phone network Claro. It lasts longer on university walls, but the artistic vandalism is at its most rambunctious and its most visceral in the Centro, where colonial architecture becomes a platform for modern conflicts and paintball protests have turned government buildings into Jackson Pollock paintings.

Sometimes it’s hard to discern who’s responsible for what when conducting graffiti archaeology; Bogotá is a city with protests in its mortars and a lot to be discontent about. Continue reading

Announcing the 2012 Teacher Residency Program

The CLACS Teacher Residency Program is a unique opportunity for New York City educators interested in professional and curriculum development on Latin America and the Caribbean. The program aims to provide a space for teachers to grow their own knowledge base, gather and create accessible and engaging teaching materials, and share materials with other educators.

Are you a K-12 educator? You are eligible to participate in the Teacher Residency Program, through which you gain access to NYU faculty, staff, library and resources! Learn how to apply.

IndocumentalesThis year, CLACS will be running two concurrent Residency Programs, one on US-Mexico topics and one on Andean topics.  Past Residency Programs have focused on Teaching the Cold War and Latin America, and Latin American Migrations. The first section of the residency on US-Mexico topics will give teachers the opportunity to collaborate with the Indocumentales/Undocumentaries: US/Mexico Interdependent Film Series project, and will be run concurrently with a graduate-level design course entitled Public Project at the Pratt Institute.

K-12 TeacherResidency 2012 - the AndesParticipants pursuing the second residency theme, topics related to the Andes, will expand their own knowledge base, gather and create accessible and engaging materials for a Middle or High School audience, and share materials with other educators. Residents will have the opportunity to connect with programming initiatives stemming from the CLACS Andean Initiative. Topics of focus could include indigenous movements, colonization, multiculturalism, power, natural resources and land rights, quechua and kichwa languages.

Visit the Teacher Residency Program page on the CLACS website for more information and to apply.

Learn more about the CLACS K-12 Outreach Program and K-12 curricular materials.

Profile: David Hanna of the CLACS Teacher Residency Program

As part of our K-12 Outreach, CLACS hosts a teacher residency program, attracting local educators who are interested in enhancing the Latin American studies curricula in their classrooms.

David Hanna, a history teacher at University Neighborhood High School in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, teaches Regents prep courses in both Global and U.S. History, as well as AP United States History.  In 2011 he participated in the CLACS Teacher Residency Program.

During his time in the program, he worked with NYU faculty and CLACS staff to research rural to urban migration in Brazil.  He also developed curricular materials about this topic, aimed for high school-aged students.  In January 2012, at the K-12 educator conference that marks the closing of the program, he and other participants presented their curricular materials to their peers. These curricular materials and others are available on the CLACS website for teachers around the world to use free of charge.

According to David, his students responded well to the curriculum, and had a lot to say during the activities. “They were probably the best conversations we had in class all semester,” David says.  He plans to teach the curriculum to future students.

David Hanna Knights of the SeaDavid is an avid history lover, which inspired his career choice.  His interest in history spans much farther than Latin America. This year he published his first book, titled Knights of the Sea, which chronicles the lives of two young naval officers in Maine during the War of 1812.

David says that he had a great experience participating in the teacher residency program, and that he would definitely recommend the program to other educators. “I grew as a teacher by broadening my understanding of Latin America. I also got to share my efforts with teachers from across the city both at the conference, as well as online,” David says.

In addition to the residency program, David is also contributing to the “Teaching Global History” book project, a project that brings educators and scholars together with the common goal of making recent research on global history more accessible to educators and students.

Visit the CLACS website to learn more about the Teacher Residency Program, or to access free K-12 curricular materials.

‘Teaching Global History’ Project Brings Educators and Scholars Together

CLACS - Global History Project

Teachers meet about the "Teaching Global History" book project.

The “Teaching Global History” book project aims to bridge the gap between historians and history teachers.  A group of four New York City public high school teachers, with help from NYU graduate students, are working to translate cutting edge history scholarship to a format that works for high school classrooms.

Mike Stoll and Maia Merin, both doctoral students in the Teaching and Learning department at NYU’s Steinhardt School, are coordinating the book’s Latin American history chapter, with institutional support from CLACS.

“We want to get historians in touch with history teachers, and try to narrow the divide,” says Maia.

The goal of “Teaching Global History,” is to suggest new ways of teaching global history that bring college-level academic scholarship to a level that younger students can engage with. Project coordinators and teachers will observe the curriculum in the classroom setting, and then evaluate the efficacy of the teaching themes and strategies.

“The point is to get historians to talk to history teachers about instruction that actually happens in schools,” Mike says.
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Summer Institute Curricular Materials Available Online

CLACS K-12 Summer Institute - Colonial Latin AmericaThis summer, the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies (CLAIS) at the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale, the Yale Programs in International Education Resources (PIER) and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) at NYU partnered on a summer institute for educators. Titled Colonial Latin America, the institute was available to educators and any member of the general public interested in learning about the latest research on colonialism and modern-day impacts of it in Latin America.

This summer institute, the first-ever collaboration between CLACS Outreach Initiatives, Yale CLAIS, and Yale PIER, consisted of a week-long workshop and an optional week-long trip to the Dominican Republic. Participants then created curricular materials based on what they learned. These curricular materials are now freely available for use via the CLACS website, included in a wide collection of resources for educators around the world who want to enrich their instruction content with more Latin American topics.

Curricular materials developed through this institute include:
Settlements and Colonial Cities in the Andean Region
Revisiting the Past: Understanding Identity and Practicing the Past Tenses through Historical Investigation
Colonial Power and Indigenous Resistance in Art

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