Tag Archives: events

Upcoming Event: The Importance of the Mother Tongue in Children’s Literature in the Caribbean

85891c95e3a314e3e36e89d572df8af0Mother Tongues United is an event organized by CLACS in partnership with  The Haitian Creole Language Institute of New York (HCLI) and Port Academie to bring together educators, authors, and activists from different language communities to discuss the importance of the use of the Mother Tongue in Children’s Literature in the Caribbean.

At the center of the event will be the discussion of Creoles of the Caribbean’s struggle with overcoming the negative stereotype associated with speaking their Mother Tongue and the legacy of historically undervalued languages of marginalized people.

Participants will discuss what is currently being done to positively promote and preserve the Mother Tongue, and how their respective diasporic communities contribute to a shift in the perception of the language.

Guest panelists will include, among others, Riva Nyri Précil, author of “Anaëlle and The Mermaid”, Carmel Balan, founder of Port Academie, and Keisha Wiel, Papiamentu Scholar. The Panel Discussion will be followed by Professional Development break-out sessions focusing on Lesson Planning, Increasing Parental Involvement, and Cultural Sensitivity Training. Light refreshments will be provided.

Please join us Monday, October 17, 5:30 p.m. at the KJCC Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public. A valid ID is required to enter the building.

NYU’s Kalman Silvert: Engaging Latin America, Building Democracy Event Re-cap

CLACS wants to thank all those who attended our 50th Anniversary Inaugural Reception and book talk that celebrated the contributions of Latin Americanist and founding CLACS Director Dr. Kalman Silvert.

Silvert’s family and scholars scholars including Jorge Balán, Abraham F. Lowenthal, Chris Mitchell, Martin Weinstein were among those who joined us in the celebration. The panelists presented the book “Kalman Silvert: Engaging Latin America, Building Democracy” and outlined Silvert’s legacy as a father, mentor, Latin Americanist and interdisciplinary scholar.

You can see the broadcast of the book presentation on our CLACS NYU Youtube page or watch the video below!

Thank you again for joining us and please be sure to check out more of our events and celebrations of our 50th Anniversary by visiting our events page.

‘Proximities/Distances’: Theatre, Performance, and Dance Conference

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Creators and performers from all over Latin America and Spain will converge at the King Juan Carlos Center (KJCC) next week for ‘Proximities/Distances’, a two-day event that will explore ideas and practices of proximity and distance in contemporary Spanish and Latin American theatre, performance and dance.

Drawing on the current interest in relational strategies and investigating the connections between art and audiences, the aesthetic and the socio-political, it will examine a diverse range of dramaturgies that bring these different media into contact.

The event is curated by Cristina Colmena (PhD Candidate, NYU Spanish Department) and Ana Sánchez Acevedo (PhD Candidate, CUNY Graduate Center). Participants will include La Phármaco (Spain), MAPA Teatro (Colombia), Íntegro (Peru), Claudio Tolcachir (Argentina), Daniel Salguero (Colombia), Pablo Remón (Spain), Alejandro Moreno (Chile), Arantxa Araujo (Mexico), David Espinosa (Spain), and more.

Please join us Tuesday, September 27 and Wednesday, September 28 at the KJCC Auditorium for this wonderful gathering of Latin American and Spanish creators and performers!

CLACS Welcomes Chilean Author José Ignacio Valenzuela in First U.S. Book Tour Presenting ‘Trilogía del Malamor y Malaluna’

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The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) in collaboration with the Embassy of Chile proudly invites you to join author José Ignacio Valenzuela in his first U.S. tour presenting Trilogy Malamor and its prequel Malaluna on Monday, September 26th at the KJCC Auditorium.

Trilogía del Malamor is a wildly successful trilogy by José Ignacio Valenzuela and is considered the first fantasy series of Latin America. Composed of the books “Hasta el fin del mundo”, “La raíz del mal” and “El árbol de la vida,” this wonderful series full of adventure, romance, enigmas and suspense delights and surprises readers with endearing characters and an unexpected ending. Set in the small mysterious town of Almahue, meaning “place of phantoms” in the Mapuche language, at the edge of the cold sea of Patagonia, it is a place where magic and fantasy abounds and where the desire to love can kill.

Malaluna is a prequel to the series released at the end of last year. Since its release it has captivated fans and new readers by recounting the previous and unknown story of the characters that give life to the Malamor saga. Valenzuela recently sold the film rights to the trilogy, so a film version of this magical story is pending.

José Ignacio Valenzuela has a vast career as an author and screenwriter for film and television in Chile, Mexico, Puerto Rico and the United States. He has published a number of novels and short fiction, and has also served as professor and instructor of creative writing.

CLACS has also invited Ángeles Donoso Macaya, Associate Professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College and expert in contemporary Latin American literature, and Chilean author Carlos Labbé. The panelists will discuss the writing of the trilogy, its reception in Latin America, the upcoming films, and more generally, the development of contemporary young adult literature in the region.

The books of the Malamor trilogy will be on sale at the event. The event will be held in Spanish and it is free and open to the public.

Please join CLACS and the Embassy of Chile in celebrating Chilean literature and José Ignacio Valenzuela’s work by joining us on September 26 at 6:30 p.m. at the KJCC Auditorium.

 

CLACS 50th Inaugural Event: Engaging Latin America, Building Democracy

Layout 1The year the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies’ (CLACS) celebrates its golden anniversary. Every significant milestone deserves reflection. In honor of our 50th year of existence, we revisited our department’s history.

The early history of the department is inextricably tied to its founding director, the gregarious Dr. Kalman Silvert. A political scientist and first-rate scholar of Latin America, he was tasked with helping to craft the early vision of NYU’s Ibero-American Language and Area Center (IALAC) under Dean George Winchester Stone Jr.

At the time of his directorship, Kalman Silvert also worked as Social Science Advisor to the Ford Foundation. Prior to his arrival at NYU he served as the first president of the Latin-American Studies Association (LASA). Silvert was instrumental in shaping an early model of internationally focused interdisciplinary studies and in helping to shape a community of regional experts in New York City. One of Silvert’s lasting legacies is his commitment to promoting scholarship, education and democratic society.

Today our center is greatly informed by this early commitment to democracy and intellectual rigor within Latin American and Caribbean Studies and it is reflected in the rich diversity of our students, exceptional language courses, community relationships, events, and scholarship.

It is in the spirit of celebrating our history and the contributions of Latin Americanists like Dr. Kalman Silvert that we  invite the entire NYU and CLACS community to help kick off the celebration of  our golden anniversary with our 50th Anniversary Inaugural Reception and Book Presentation this Friday, September 16th.

We will feature four Latin Americanists that will discuss the legacy of political scientist and CLACS founding director Kalman H. Silvert. We have invited important scholars Jorge Balán, Abraham F. Lowenthal, Chris Mitchell, Martin Weinstein to discuss the recently published book “Kalman Silvert: Engaging Latin America, Building Democracy.”

The book presentation will be preceded by the CLACS 50th Anniversary Inaugural Reception at 4:30pm. This event is free and open to the public. Please join us this upcoming Friday to kick off our celebration of CLACS 50th Anniversary!

‘A New-New Left in Latin America?’ with Verónika Mendoza Event Recap

Thanks to everyone who joined us last Friday for our event ‘A New-New Left in Latin America?: The Challenge of Progressive Politics in the Midst of a Conservative Turn.’ More than two hundred students, professors, activists, local media, Peruvian journalists and community members joined us at KJCC Auditorium to hear former Peruvian Presidential candidate Verónika Mendoza speak about the rise of  a ‘New-New left’ in the region.

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CLACS Assistant Director Omar Dauhajre presented the event and panelists. Speakers included essayist and poet Mariela Dreyfus who highlighted the feminist activism in Peru and Jose Luis Rénique, historian and principal professor at Lehman College, who discussed democracy, education, and the promise of the left. Panelist Paula Garcia shifted the conversation to the challenges of the Frente Amplio as an organization.

Verónika shared her perspectives about the challenges of the Left in the new Latin American scenario, her strong results in notoriously conservative Peru, and her vision of the future. One of her strongest messages was,  “The absence of the left in national politics represents an opportunity to create something new.”

You can watch a video of the event on the CLACS NYU Youtube page, included below!


Thanks again for joining us, please be sure to learn more about our events on our webpage here.

Welcome Back and Upcoming CLACS Events

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The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) at NYU would like to welcome back our students and faculty and wishes all our followers a happy Fall!

We kicked off the semester by enthusiastically welcoming our newest MA students at orientation. We are excited to have such a dynamic group begin a new academic year.

We would like to usher in the new semester with an amazing set of events at our center. Some of the events we have planned for the Fall include a talk with Peruvian activist Verónika Mendoza about the challenges of the Left in the new Latin American scenario; a POETEA showcase to celebrate Quechua & Kreyòl  with a night of poetry and tea; a panel presentation of the book “Kalman Silvert: Engaging Latin America, Building Democracy,” to celebrate CLACS’s founding director and the center’s 50th anniversary; and and a presentation of the Chilean fantasy series “Trilogía del Malamor.”

Stay tuned for CLACS events this fall by joining the CLACS email list, liking CLACS at NYU on Facebook, and following us on Twitter at @clacs_nyu!

Live Streaming and New Participants in “From War to Politics”

“From War to Politics” begins this Thursday night with a keynote address by Álvaro de Soto, former UN Assistant Secretary-General for Political Affairs, at Columbia University. On Friday and Saturday, the conference continues at New York University with panels of key players in the peace talks and scholars of the process.

For those who cannot attend the conference in person, we are offering live streaming video of every talk and panel that can be viewed wherever there is an internet connection. Click here for the links to the live streams in both English and Spanish.

Join us to learn more about why the process worked, who made it possible and how each side perceived the outcomes. In addition to the existing participants, including the former President of El Salvador, an FMLN representative to the Accords, and a former US Ambassador to El Salvador, we are pleased to announce the following additions to the program:

parada_luis_newLuis Parada: Parada was assigned to the Salvadoran Embassy in Washington DC, where he represented the Armed Forces and assisted the Salvadoran Ambassador in his relations with Congress and the Administration in support of the peace process.

 

1157752802_740215_0000000000_noticia_normalFrancesc Vendrell: Former UN Ambassador and Secretary-General’s Deputy Representative in the El Salvador peace process. He has specialized in Central America and worked closely and extensively with Secretary-Generals Javier Pérez de Cuéllar and Boutros Boutros-Ghali.

 

 

 

peter_romeroPeter Romero: Former US ambassador and Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs. Romero pioneered and directed whole-of-government programs to demobilize army and guerrilla combatants and the commensurate community-based development strategies still employed in Iraq and Afghanistan today.

canciller-martinez-titulares-rree2Hugo Martinez: The current Foreign Minister of El Salvador, who will deliver a message from the current President of El Salvador, Sánchez Cerén.

 

Spring Colloquium 2015 – Marlene Daut and the Racial Discourse of Haitian Print Culture

Marlene Daut and her new book Tropics of Haiti:  Race and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865

Marlene Daut and her new book Tropics of Haiti: Race and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865

Written by CLACS MA Student Patrick Moreno-Covington

As scholars, there is always a hint of uncertainty as to where the fruits of our research will take us. We can so easily start from one time period, community or region and end up “across the world” two or three centuries removed. That is certainly the case for next Monday’s installment of the fascinating Spring 2015 Colloquium Series – Latin American Independence in the Age of Revolution featuring Marlene Daut Associate Professor of English and Cultural Studies at Claremont Graduate University. So how did Daut, an English professor, end up speaking on the print culture in the period following the Haitian Revolution in a series focused on the Atlantic Revolutions of the 18th and 19th centuries?

Daut’s path to her academic subject of interest and to completing her upcoming book, Tropics of Haiti: Race and the Literary History of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World, 1789-1865 certainly was unorthodox but has been instrumental in the development of her interests. Graduating from Loyola Marymount University with a double B.A. in French and English, Marlene thought she could combine her two interests by studying the literature of francophone Louisiana in the antebellum period as part of the University of Notre Dame’s English department. Building on the links she found between a newly independent Haiti and the francophone culture in the American south, Marlene began digging into a vast body of Haitian fiction that emerged to fictionalize the the events of the Haitian revolution.

But were these works of fiction? Despite containing what were clearly fictionalized accounts of actors integral to the revolution and especially Toussaint Louverture, Daut began to find that the authors of these novels all claimed that the events and descriptions of the Revolution not as fiction but as accurate histories. In particular, elements of the stories describing the racial taxonomies present in Haiti at the time of the uprising and the enlightenment roots of the Revolution were related as truth in the plays, fiction and even the journalism of the time.  As Marlene began to follow these these stories from their circulation in the Antilles and across the Atlantic to Europe, she found clear indications that many of these “histories” were being wholesale reprinted and retold by authors around the world. Daut groups these repeated tropes into to narrative categories – the “mulatto” vengeance narrative and the Enlightenment narrative.

Each of these narratives, while seemingly opposed, worked in conjunction with each other to define the racial discourse of the Revolution and beyond. In many ways, Daut’s work points to the beginnings of a sense of biological racism – defined by the proponents use of “scientific” veracity – that defined the post-independece era of race relations. The investigations into Haitian print culture and its lasting influence on racial discourse can serve as a critical key to revealing some of the silences around the Haitian Revolution that are beginning to be exposed with a new surge in Haiti scholarship.

It is here that the potential impact of Dauts work can extend far beyond discussions of history and literature of the 19th century and into the present day. In light of some of the many comments from public figures that emerged following the 2010 Hatian earthquake Daut can see the racialized tropes of the 1800’s begin to rear their ugly head once again. In a time where it is so easy to click ‘share’ and ‘retweet’, Daut’s work asks us to examine what language we copy and replicate and their implications.

Join CLACS Monday, April 13th at 6 pm in the King Juan Carlos Center Auditorium for Marlene Daut’s talk on Race and the Transatlantic Print Culture of the Haitian Revolution 1789-1865.

Follow CLACS on Facebook and Twitter to stay up to date on all CLACS events and goings on in Latin America. 

Welcome Back! Ready for an Exciting Spring?

Welcome back to all CLACS Students!

winter meets spring

This semester CLACS will offer unique and interesting courses, with topics ranging from the sociology of the image to the construction of the nation-state and the emergence of citizenships in Latin America and the Caribbean. We’ll explore topics from international human rights to ethnographic methods and political science.

The Spring 2014 Interdisciplinary Seminar will be taught by Professor Ada Ferrer and Sibylle M. Fischer and will be dedicated to the culture and history of the Caribbean islands. The class will examine slavery and the struggles against it, colonialism and independence movements, U.S. occupations, dictatorships, and revolutionary movements, the massive growth of a Caribbean diaspora, and the transformation of the Caribbean islands into so many tourist destinations. As part of the Seminar, the Center will offer a Colloquium Series entitled Whither the Caribbean? that will take place at KJCC Auditorium.  A number of important scholars from across the hemisphere to guest lecture, including Robin Derby on March 31 and Stephan Palmié on May 5.

Students will also have the opportunity to take classes of Quechua at different levels, and to celebrate Quechua languages and cultures of South America through the Quechua Conversation Nights. This semester CLACS students will also have the chance of taking the course Portuguese for Spanish Speakers.

The calendar will be rich in events open to the public. NACLA and CLACS will collaborate on  writing workshops throughout the semester, the first of which is Shaping Academic Work for a Wider Audience, taking place on February 7th here at CLACS.

CLACS is hosting several conferences. The first, Politics of the Popular in Latin America (March 7) examines the rise of populism and politics from below. On April 3rd and 4th, an international two-day conference American (Inter)Dependencies: New Perspectives on Capitalism and Empire, 1898-1959, will bring together scholars of the United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean to explore the multidirectional processes, reciprocal impacts, and global dimensions of inter-American economic relations.

The Graduate Association of Latin American Studies is organizing a photographic exhibition that will take place at the Stovall Gallery, 8th floor of the Kimmel Center, from April 7 to May 4, 2014. The title is The Civil War and Its Aftermath: Stories of El Salvador, and it will be accompanied by a film series, a symposium and the publication of a digital catalog written in collaboration with graduate students.

Mark your calendars for the coming CLACS Spring programming!

Posted by Camilla Querin – MA Candidate at CLACS / Museum Studies