Tag Archives: FLAS

Class and Color Blindness in Mexican Consumer Segmentation

Advertisement from upscale department store in Mexico City

Advertisement from upscale department store in Mexico City

Posted by Marcel Rosa-Salas – doctoral student in Sociocultural Anthropology  at NYU

The trade organization responsible for developing los niveles socioeconomicos, the Mexican approach to consumer segmentation, takes inspiration from French and British consumer segmentation models. Whereas traditional consumer segmentation models in the United States rely more explicitly on conceptions of race, several global ad agencies have their own based entirely on class status. What distinguishes class-based consumer segmentation in Mexico is the particular social, cultural, economic and political dynamics that maintain a staunch commitment to color blindness. This commitment shapes the way this socioeconomic stratification looks as well as the way it is discussed by marketers in Mexico.

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Ethnographies of “Culturas Indígenas Preservadas”

Posted by Oscar Marquez, Doctoral Student in American Studies, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at NYU

I will be spending six weeks in Guadalajara as a guest researcher at the Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores de Antropología Social (CIESAS) to conduct preliminary research for my dissertation. I will be conducting archival and (hopefully) some ethnographic research to understand the racial motives underlining the dispossession of Wirárika (Huichol) territory by non-indigenous rural Mexicans. I have been here in Guadalajara for close to two weeks and it is clear that it is going to be difficult making contact with Huichol communities in the sierra. There are multiple organizations and groups of people based in the city of Guadalajara whom do some type of support/solidarity work with these communities but many seem to be weary of an outsider arriving with intentions to visit and know these indigenous communities that are often identified by the interlocutors mentioned above as “culturas indígenas preservadas”, or authentic Indians. Continue reading

Inti Raymi: Reciprocity and Anti-Colonial Symbolism

Posted by Dusty Christensen – MA Candidate at CLACS / Global Journalism at NYU

Christensen – Ecuador – IntiRaymi

Inti Raymi festivities in the village of San Roque (Photo by Dustin Christensen)

For many indigenous residents of the Andes, the Inti Raymi festival is one of the most important celebrations of the year. Celebrating the summer solstice, this festival has its origins firmly rooted in pre-Colombian times. In Cotacachi, Ecuador, where I conducted my summer research, this was the most important festival of the year. Members of the 40 something indigenous communities surrounding Cotacachi dance house-to-house in the nights preceding the festival. Then, for several days, they gather and dance down to the town’s central plaza, where they dance, sing, play music, drink, and occasionally engage in violent confrontations with other communities.

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Interacting with Native Quechua Speakers in the North of Potosí, Bolivia

Posted by: Gladys Camacho Rios – MA Candidate at CLACS / Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU

The second part of my fieldwork took place in Toro Toro north of the city of Potosí, Bolivia. After finishing the first part of my fieldwork in Tarabuco, northwest of Sucre, I went back to Cochabamba in order to take a bus to the mountainous town of Toro Toro. It has several tourist attractions like: dinosaur footprints, cave paintings, natural waterfalls, the biggest explored caves in Bolivia, and a big canyon. Most people who live in the town speak Quechua.

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(Re)Defining Mestizaje in Mexico City

Gaspar Yanga - First Liberator of the Americas - section of mural located in the Palacio Muncipal of Xalapa, Veracruz

Gaspar Yanga – First Liberator of the Americas – section of mural located in the Palacio Municipal of Xalapa, Veracruz

Written by Patrick Moreno-Covington CLACS MA Candidate 

Stepping out of customs and into one of the many cabs queued up outside of Mexico City’s Benito Juárez airport, I became immediately consumed by all things Chilango. Street performers and vendors at traffic lights, insane amounts of traffic, delicious spits of marinated pork known as al Pastor slowly rotating on the sidewalk and so. many. people. The sights, smells and sounds of the megalopolis almost subsumed my attentive capabilities so that I barely caught the taxi driver asking me where I was coming from. My Spanish accent (or the fact that I was leaving an airport) must have given me away.

‘The United States, Texas’, ‘Ahh the United States, there are a lot of racist problems over there, right?’ ‘And that politician, he said a lot of bad things about Mexicans’. While trying to avoid an elongated discussion on why Donald Trump lowers the political standards of the country with his shameful and inflammatory rhetoric, I did want to engage my driver’s interpretation of America’s race problems.

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