Tag Archives: Garifuna

Recap of an Evening with Honduran Indigenous Leaders Conversation

On July 12, 2017, CLACS hosted a timely event with two of Honduras best known indigenous leaders. The night’s conversation featured Bertha Zúniga Cáceres, daughter of the late Lenca community leader Berta Cáceres and General Coordinator of  the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH), and Miriam Miranda who is General Coordinator of the Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras (ONAFREH) and a well-known Garífuna community leader.

The night’s events began with a presentation of two short clips honoring the memory Berta Cáceres, which also served to contextualize the conversation to come. The first clip, was from the Berta Vive documentary, followed by a part of the acceptance speech by the Lenca leader from her acceptance of the Goldman Prize (2015). With this, the stage was set for the conversation with the featured speakers moderated by Grassroots International‘s Latin America Program Coordinator Jovanna Garcia Soto.

With a capacity room, the conversation featured insights on current affairs in the struggles of the indigenous communities in Honduras. Bertha Zúniga spoke about the legacy of her late mother, the importance of unity in resistance struggles, and denounced current anti-terrorism laws. Miriam Miranda, on her part, highlighted the importance of her people’s cultural traditions and spirituality in resisting the current crisis in favor of of life in Honduras.

This event was co-sponsored by Grassroots International and NYU’s Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics.

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CLACS Students’ Articles Appear on Digital News Networks

A boy plays soccer on a beach in Arnapala, Honduras. Photo by Danielle Mackey, MA '14

A boy plays soccer on a beach in Arnapala, Honduras. Photo by Danielle Mackey, MA ’14

Three Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Journalism dual-degree students had articles published on major digital news outlets this week.

Nicki Fleischner’s article, titled “Alternatives to Detention Leave Some Honduran Immigrants in ‘Schackles appears on the Latin America News Dispatch. In her piece, Fleischner follows a Garífuna woman living in the Bronx who is forced to wear an electronic monitoring device since arriving in the city.

Dusty Christensen examines “Why Innocent People Plead Guilty,” which appears on AlterNet. Christensen’s article addresses the many ways in which defendants are pushed to agree to plea bargains in pre-trial negotiations.

Danielle Mackey, who recently completed her MA Studies in Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Journalism, has written a piece that appears on The New Republic, titled “‘I’ve Seen All Sorts of Horrific Things in My Time. But None as Detrimental to the Country as This.’” Her article explores “charter cities,” the Honduran government’s newest development plan, which sprouts from an idea from New York University economist Paul Romer, and has been deemed “a dangerous economic experiment.”

Nicki Fleischner and Dusty Christensen are currently enrolled in the Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Journalism joint-degree program. Danielle Mackey is a 2014 graduate of the LACS/Journalism joint-degree program.