Tag Archives: gonzales

Odi Vidanmanta Willakuwanku

Rimasun - Odi Gonzales - CLACS at NYUOdi Gonzales kan profesor NYUpi. Pay yachachishan Runasimita. Pay kan Calcamanta ichaqa kunan tiyashan Greenwich Villagepi, New Yorkpi. Kay audiopi, Odi riman vidanmanta Rebecca Fischerwan.

Odi Gozales es profesor en NYU. Él enseña el idioma Quechua. Él es de Calca, Peru, pero ahora vive en Greenwich Village, en Nueva York. En este audio, Odi habla de su vida con Rebecca Fischer.

Odi Gonzales is a professor at NYU, where he teaches Quechua. He is from Calca, Peru, but he presently lives in Greenwich Village, in New York City. In this podcast, Odi speaks with Rebecca Fischer about his life.


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Suscríbete a Rimasun a través de iTunes o a través de otro servicio de podcast
Download this episode (right click, save link as…) / Guarda este episodio

Odi Gonzalespa Harawinmanta

Virgenes Urbanas - Santa Rosa de LimaKay audiopi, harawiku Odi Gonzales rimashan Rebecca Fischerwan, Christine Mladicwan, ima, libronkunamanta, qhelqasqanmanta.  Chaymanta, ñawinchashan poemanta huk libronmanta Virgenes Urbanas.

En este audio, el poeta Odi Gonzales habla de sus libros y de sus escritos con Rebecca Fischer y Christine Mladic.  Después lee uno de sus poemas del libro Virgenes Urbanas

In this podcast, poet Odi Gonzales discusses his books and writings with Rebecca Fischer and Christine Mladic.  He then reads one of his poems from the book Virgenes Urbanas.

Learn more about the work of Peruvian photographer Ana de Orbegoso.


 Subscribe to Rimasun via iTunes or via another podcast service

Suscríbete a Rimasun a través de iTunes o a través de otro servicio de podcast

Download this episode (right click, save link as…) / Guarda este episodio

Quechua Courses at NYU

Quechua at CLACS at NYULast fall, 2008, NYU offered its first Quechua class. About 12 of us met three times a week with Odi Gonzales of Cusco, Peru. Like the beginning of learning any new language, we struggled through the first few weeks, battling knee-knocking waves of frustration, surprise, success and total confusion. Now in our second semester, we may not quite yet be able to rock out in Quechua, but we can carry on simple conversations and make some jokes.

Quechua is an indigenous language spoken by an estimated 10,000,000 people in South America. Although it has a major presence in Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador (Quichua), there are also Quechua speakers in parts of Colombia, Argentina, Brazil and Chile. Quechua existed before the Spanish arrived in South America in the early 16th century, and it existed before the Incan empire of the 1400s established Quechua as its official language of the state. Because of its co-existence with Spanish for about 500 years, and because of the changes in the world that have occurred over the centuries, some words are not translatable into Quechua; rather in certain contexts they are spoken in Spanish.

The US Department of Education allocates funds to CLACS at NYU so that Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships can be offered to students. FLAS Fellowships are awarded separately for both annual year and summer study. Quechua is one of the languages offered at NYU that is eligible for FLAS Fellowships. Visit the CLACS FLAS Fellowship webpage for more information.

Christine Mladic is an MA Candidate at CLACS at NYU