Tag Archives: Indigenous

Indigenous Puno?

MalagaSabogal_Peru_Puno.JPG

Posted by Ximena Málaga Sabogal – PhD student in Anthropology at NYU

It has been a couple of weeks since I arrived in Puno, one of the biggest cities in the southern Peruvian Andes. I have a long history with this city, having researched in the area throughout my bachelor and masters degree. Still, Puno was always a place to go through, in order to get somewhere else. This time I am going to spend two months in the city, going through the archives and talking to people who can somehow enlighten me on my research topic. Although I am an anthropologist, I also have a background in history and always try to bring these two together in my research. I am interested in the Aymara and Quechua identity definitions and its connections with the international indigenous movement.

Who is indigenous? What does it even mean? For a long time, this was not a question being asked in Peru. El problema del Indio (the Indian problem) became a topic at the beginning of the 20th century but the question about who is indio was not put forward until the last decades. As in Latin America more broadly, ethnicity in Peru is constructed through a combination of quite fluid physical and cultural categories that are sometimes claimed as means of self-identification, but more often ascribed by others. During the first half of the 20th century, the category of race became culturized (and culture became racialized) which led to even more complications in the definitions of who the indio was. From an elite and “white” perspective, national progress required de-indianization of the country’s population, to be accomplished through education and literacy, while the growing rural-to-urban migration process watered down distinct cultural characteristics of those who only a decade before were considered by the state as definitely Indian. Velasco Alvarado’s revolutionary government (1968-1975) further advanced the process of de-indianization, although for different reasons, advocating for the use of the term “peasant.

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Ethnographies of “Culturas Indígenas Preservadas”

Posted by Oscar Marquez, Doctoral Student in American Studies, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at NYU

I will be spending six weeks in Guadalajara as a guest researcher at the Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores de Antropología Social (CIESAS) to conduct preliminary research for my dissertation. I will be conducting archival and (hopefully) some ethnographic research to understand the racial motives underlining the dispossession of Wirárika (Huichol) territory by non-indigenous rural Mexicans. I have been here in Guadalajara for close to two weeks and it is clear that it is going to be difficult making contact with Huichol communities in the sierra. There are multiple organizations and groups of people based in the city of Guadalajara whom do some type of support/solidarity work with these communities but many seem to be weary of an outsider arriving with intentions to visit and know these indigenous communities that are often identified by the interlocutors mentioned above as “culturas indígenas preservadas”, or authentic Indians. Continue reading

Yachachiq Yvan Gutierrez, UNIBOL Qhichwa Jatun Yachaywasipi, Yachakuqkunaman Tukuy Sunqunwan Yachachispa Llamk’arichkan


Quechua Yvan Gutierrez Unibol CLACS NYU Rimasun Bolivia Cochabamba Chimore ingenia agronomia forestal fruticultura Tata Yvan Gutiérrezqa ingeniero agrónomo. Pay Marquilla-Aiquile ayllupi Cochabamba-Boliviapi paqarisqa. Tata Yvanqa trópico (Chaparepi) 14 watataña tiyakun. Kaypi laya puquchiqkunawan llamk’asqa, pikunachus latanu, piña, maracuyá, arroz puquchisqankuta wak suyukunaman apaqkunawan (UNABANA). Kunanpi “Casimiro Huanca Qhichwa” jatun yachaywasipi, Chimoré-Boliviapi yachachiq. Pay Agro-Forestaríata, Silviculturata, Cultivosta chanta Fruticulturata ima yachachin. Yachachiq ñisqanmanjina, yachakuqkuna allinta yacharikunanku tiyan, sumaqta puquykunata puqurichinankupaq, sach’akutapis kawsachinankupaq, chanta chay tukuy yachayninkuyta ayllunkupi riqsirichinankupaq.
Practicas llamk’aypi yachakuqkuna arrozta, hortalizasta tarpunku chanta imaynatachus puqusqanta qhatinku. Tata Yvan llamk’ayninwan may kusisqa kachkan imaptinchus, juch’uy ayllukunamanta yachakuqkunaman yachayninta riqsirichisqanrayku.
Gladys Camacho Riosqa CLACS-NYUpi Maestríamanta juk yachakuq. Pay kay podcasta Boliviapi, 2014 watapi grabarqa, imaptinchus pay karusuyumantapacha Rimasunpaq llamk’achkarpa.

Yvan Gutiérrez, es ingeniero agrónomo. Nació en la comunidad de Marquilla-Aiquile, Cochabamba-Bolivia. Yvan vive en el trópico (Chapare) desde hace 14 años donde trabajó con distintas asociaciones de producción y exportación de banana, piña, maracuyá, arroz (Exportadora -UNABANA). Actualmente es docente en la “Universidad Indígena Quechua Casimiro Huanca”, en Chimoré-Bolivia. El dicta las materias de Agro-Forestaría, Silvicultura, Cultivos y Fruticultura. Según el docente, es importante que los estudiantes adquieran las estrategias y metodologías adecuadas para producir alimentos, a conservar las plantas y aplicar esos conocimientos en sus comunidades. En las horas prácticas de la materia los estudiantes siembran arroz, hostilizas y controlan el proceso de producción. El docente esta contento con su trabajo ya que comparte sus conocimientos con estudiantes que vienen de distintas comunidades al igual que él.
Gladys Camacho Rios es una estudiante de maestría en CLACS-NYU. Ella grabó este podcast en Bolivia en 2014 como correspondiente internacional de Rimasun.

Yvan Gutierrez is an agronomical engineer. He was born in Marquilla-Aiquile province, in Cochabamba, Bolivia. He has lived in the tropical area (Chapare) for 14 years. He has worked with different associations in the production and exportation of bananas, pineapple, passion fruit and rice (UNABANA). Currently, he is a lecturer at the Casimiro Huanca Quechua Indigenous University in Chimoré, Bolivia. He teaches courses on agro-forestry, silviculture, farming and fruit farming. According to Yvan, it is important that students learn to appropriate strategies and methodologies in order to transmit what they learned in their communities. Through his courses, students gain experience by sowing rice and green vegetables. They also monitor the process of production. Yvan is proud of his work because he shares his knowledge with students who come from different small communities like him.
Gladys Camacho Rios is an MA student at CLACS-NYU. She recorded this podcast in Bolivia in 2014 as international correspondent of Rimasun.


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Suscríbete a Rimasun a través de iTunes o a través de otro servicio de podcast
Download this episode (right click, save link as…) / Guarda este episodio

An Alternative Narrative of Development

Photo by Jose Raul Guzman

Photo by José Raúl Guzmán

In his address to the United Nations General Assembly, Bolivian President Evo Morales called for a more inclusive “people-centric” global development agenda that included acquiring control of natural resources for the benefit of all. The day before, CLACS students and guests heard a very different story about the Morales government’s inclusion of indigenous groups in Bolivia’s economic development from 5 indigenous Bolivian women and one ally as part of the “Dialogue on Indigenous Rights: The Issues of Autonomy and Consultation in the Plurinational State of Bolivia” event held in the King Juan Carlos Center.

Organized by CLACS professor Pamela Calla, the women, Nilda Rojas Huanka, Toribia Lero Quispe, Clara Victoria Ramos Aillón, Judith Rivero, Wilma Mendoza, and Sarela Paz, representing indigenous groups from across Bolivia, came to CLACS prior to their attendance at the United Nations Indigenous Peoples World Conference. Each woman spoke on a different element of indigenous relationships with the Morales government and economic development including the lack of environmental protections, the preeminence of laws that protect the mining industry over constitutional safeguards for indigenous rights, and the political co-option and subversion of the alliance between CIDOB and CONAMAQ—the two largest confederations of indigenous governing bodies in Bolivia.

Each of these moving testimonials revealed the challenges that remain for indigenous groups in Bolivia. In a country that adopted a new constitution in 2009 and declared itself “plurinational” in order to promote increased autonomy for its indigenous groups, the women told how these rights have been rolled back or overridden in the following years. The question remained whether the plurinational government of Bolivia could be inclusive while developing the country’s economy and resources.

One of the persistent threads in each presentation was the need to have indigenous voices heard in the Bolivian legislature and public and, where that is not possible, to raise consciousness on an international scale. Through our academic work and community events, NYU’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies seeks to give a platform for voices that would otherwise go unheard.

Photo by Jose Raul Guzman

Photo by José Raúl Guzmán

Find out more about the work going on at CLACS and our events here.

Posted by CLACS-MA student Patrick Moreno-Covington.

Tata Juan Coronado Qhichwa Kawsaymanta UNIBOLpi Yachachishasqa


UNIBOL Bolivia Quechua Podcast Chimoré Cultural de la Nación Tata Juan Coronado Mojocoya-Zudañez provincia jap’iypi, Chuquisaca-Boliviapi paqarisqa. Payqa Qhichwa Casimiro Huanca (UNIBOL) jatun yachaywasipi yachachiq. Pay “Qhichwa kawsaymanta” yachachin. Astawanpis Qhichwallapi parlaspa yachachin, wakin kutitaq kastilla simipipis parlasqanmanta ch’uwanchaykurispa. Kay clasepiqa “Filosofía amaútica” tawantinsuyu chhiqapi kawsaymanta t’ukunku. Jinallamantataq Calendario Tradicionalmantapis ch’aqwarillankutaq. Paykunapaqqa kay Calendarioqa tata intip chanta mama killap kuyuyninmanjina llamk’aq kasqa. Chantapis Chakanaman jinaqa tawa jatun raymikuna karqa ñinku. Chaykunata qhawarispataq, yachachiq Juanpa clasekunanqa mana teoríallachu, ruwaspa rikuchiypis kallantaq. Yachakuqkunaqa jatun yachaywasi ukhup chaqran patapi may sumaqta ruwaspa yacharikunku.
Gladys Camacho Riosqa CLACS-NYUpi Maestríamanta juk yachakuq. Pay kay podcasta Boliviapi, 2014 watapi grabarqa, imaptinchus pay karusuyumantapacha Rimasunpaq llamk’achkarpa.

Juan Coronado nació en Mojocoya-Provincia Zudañez, Chuquisaca-Bolivia. Es docente en la Universidad Indígena Quechua Casimiro Huanca (UNIBOL), en Chimoré- Bolivia. Dicta la materia de “Cultura de la Nación Quechua.” Sus clases son impartidas mayormente en Quechua sin embargo también facilita aclaraciones en español. En la materia se reflexiona sobre la filosofía amaútica de la cultura andina. De igual forma se discuten los temas del calendario tradicional que estaban basados en el movimiento del sol y la luna. Enfatizan que en la cultura quechua existían 4 fiestas tradicionales de acuerdo a la Chakana. Las clases impartidas por el docente no solo son teóricas sino también prácticas. Los estudiantes realizan dramatizaciones en los sembradíos del campus universitario.
Gladys Camacho Rios es una estudiante de maestría en CLACS-NYU. Ella grabó este podcast en Bolivia en 2014 como correspondiente internacional de Rimasun.

Juan Coronado was born in Mojocoya community in Zudañez province, Chuquisaca-Bolivia. He is a lecturer at the Casimiro Huanca Quechua Indigenous University, in Chimoré-Bolivia. He teaches a course titled “Culture of the Quechua Nation.” Classes are taught in the Quechua language, however he also answers some question in Spanish. The course presents the philosophies of the wise elders of Andean cultures. It also discusses the traditional calendar, which was based in the movement of the sun and the moon, and emphasizes the four traditional fiestas of the Chakana found in Quechua cultures. Coronado’s classes deal not only with theories, but also with practices. Students also enact dramatic performances in the fields of the university campus.
Gladys Camacho Rios is an MA student at CLACS-NYU. She recorded this podcast in Bolivia in 2014 as international correspondent of Rimasun.


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https://clacsnyublog.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/rimasun_phuyupyawarwaqayninlibromanta.mp3 Suscríbete a Rimasun a través de iTunes o a través de otro servicio de podcast
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Iskay Willaykunata Willariwanchik Gladys Camacho

Rimasun Cochabamba Bolivia linguist andean tales quechua condor zorro clacs nyuGladys Camacho kan lingüista Cochabambamanta Boliviamanta. Kay podcastpi iskay andino ñisqa willaykunata willariwanchik. Ñawpaq willaypiqa, Gladys iskay llulla wawakunamantawan unqusqa mamankumantawan willariqanchik. Qhipan willaypiqa, Gladys atuqmantawan kunturmantawan willariwanchik.

Gladys Camacho es una lingüista boliviana de Cochabamba. En este podcast nos relata dos cuentos clásicos andinos. En el primer cuento nos relata sobre dos hijos mentirosos y su madre enferma. Seguidamente nos relata un cuento sobre el zorro y el cóndor.

Gladys Camacho is a linguist from Cochabamba, Bolivia. In this podcast she tells us two classic Andean stories. The first is a dramatic tale about two sons who lie to their sick mother and suffer the consequences. The second story is about the adventure of a condor and a fox.


Subscribe to Rimasun via iTunes or via another podcast service
Suscríbete a Rimasun a través de iTunes o a través de otro servicio de podcast
Download this episode (right click, save link as…) / Guarda este episodio

Quechua Radio in the Southern Andes of Peru: Part II

In Part 1, I shared my experiences with Quechua radio in Huanta, Ayacucho. I continued my research by traveling to Vilcashuaman, a tiny, cold town high up in the puna, 11,350 feet above sea level.

When the bus reached a mountain peak, the radio picked up a strong signal from Vilcashuaman’s main station, even though we were still three hours away. The station played huaynos. Occasionally, the announcers shared news from the municipalidad and del Estado, in both Spanish and Quechua. We passed Condorcocha (condor lake). When the bus stopped to pick up passengers, I heard playful comments in Quechua like pipas tanqay mamayta — can somebody help push the mamita wearing many skirts] through the door?”

Loayza-Peru-Mujeres

Monolingual Quechua speakers, Plaza of Vilcashuaman

Finally we arrived into town. There was an amazing plaza constructed by the Incas after they conquered their longtime enemy, the Chankas. The plaza was full of senior citizens dressed in beautiful traditional clothing. I began to talk with them, mostly the ladies. They came from small villages throughout the region, traveling by foot or combi, to pick up their pensions from the local office of Banco Nacion, the state bank. They were beneficiaries of Pensión 65, a program started by the State in 2012 to provide monthly benefits (125 soles or $45) to seniors in poor rural areas.

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