Tag Archives: Latin America

When ‘the New’ Conquered Latin America: Newness and Value in the Era of Independence

foto VíctorOn Monday, March 2nd, our Spring 2015 Colloquium Lecture Series continues in exploring the topic of Latin American independence through an interdisciplinary lens that includes political history, political theory, and cultural studies. For this second lecture titled “When ‘the New’ Conquered Latin America: Newness and Value in the Era of Independence,” we will be hosting Victor Goldgel-Carballo of the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

In what promises to be a fascinating talk, Professor Goldgel-Carballo will explore the value of newness as an increasingly contested criterion throughout Latin America in the early 19th century. Focusing on problems of temporality in Havana, Buenos Aires, and Santiago de Chile, Goldgel-Carballo talk will analyze, among other things, the power to mark the emergence of a new time attributed to media and the development of new forms of discursive authority, such as the ability to be “up-to-date.” This lecture and the reception to follow will be held at the Deutsches Haus starting at 6pm.

Victor Goldgel-Carballo is Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research and teaching focuses on 19th-century Latin American literature, media history, visual culture, and racial categories. His book Cuando lo nuevo conquistó América. Prensa, moda y literatura en el siglo XIX (Buenos Aires: Siglo XXI, 2013), was awarded the Premio Iberoamericano by the Latin American Studies Association. Cuando lo nuevo conquistó América reconstructs the emergence of the new as a modern criterion of value in Latin America. He has also published on the figure of the impostor in the Cuban novel, the Latin American origins of snobbery, and the aesthetic articulations of the art of “making do” in contemporary Argentina. A recipient of fellowships and grants from the Social Science Research Council, the Mellon Foundation, the John W. Kluge Center, the University of Warwick, and the UW-Madison Institute for Research in the Humanities, he is currently at work on a book project entitled Passing as Open Secret: Race and Fictions of Identity in Nineteenth-Century Cuba.

The March 2nd talk will be followed by a lecture titled “Race and the Transatlantic Print Culture of the Haitian Revolution, 1789-1865,” April 13th at the KJCC Auditorium by Marlene Daut, Assistant Professor of English and Cultural Studies Claremont Graduate University. Two weeks later, on April 27th, novelist and professor at Goucher University, Madison Smartt Bell will give a lecture titled “Desalines Disembodied.” On May 11th, our closing lecture of the series will be “Bolívar as Slaveholder, the Image of 1815, and the Myth of Abolition,” by Michael Zeuske of Universität zu Köln, Iberische und Lateinamerikanische Abt./ Historisches Institut.

To register for the March 2nd lecture please click here. For more information about the Colloquium series, and other upcoming events please click here or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Spring 2015 Colloquium: Latin American Independence in the Age of Revolution

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On February 23rd, CLACS inaugurates its Spring 2015 Colloquium Series “Latin American Independence in the Age of Revolution” with a lecture by Sergio Serulnikov, Director of the Graduate Program in History at the University of San Andres in Buenos Aires, Argentina. His talk, titled “La crisis del orden colonial en Hispanoamérica,” will address crucial theoretical and methodological issues in the political history of Latin American independence. Professor Serulnikov contests scholarly positions that point to 1808 as the starting point of the colonial crisis after the Napoleonic invasion of Spain. Serulnikov, who is also a researcher at the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la Argentina (Conicet), maintains that in order to understand Hispanic America’s different responses to the Spanish Kingdom’s debacle one needs a local, integrated, and long term view of these processes. This lecture and the reception to follow will be held at the Deutsches Haus starting at 6pm.

This lecture is part of a Research Colloquium which combines a graduate level course with a lecture series. The event series brings top scholars from around the world to present current research to the NYU community as well as the general public. CLACS Faculty members Sinclair Thomson and Sybille Fischer are co-teaching and spearheading the Spring 2015 Research Colloquium.

The colloquium features an interdisciplinary approach that “explores Latin American independence through readings in political history, political theory, and cultural studies,” said Professor Thomson. Special attention will be given to “primary sources (including chronicles, philosophical disquisitions, pamphlets and propaganda, speeches, constitutions, travelers’ accounts) and the distinctive and complementary aspects of historiographic and literary approaches.” Thomson adds that, “a broad awareness of historical context and careful attention to historical texts can yield revealing new understandings of the past.”

The February 23rd talk will be followed by “When the New Conquered in Latin America: Newness and Value in the Era of Independence,” with Victor Goldgel- Carballo, Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, on March 2nd. Goldgel’s talk is also at the Deutsches Haus. On April 13th, the Colloquium moves to the KJCC Auditorium where Marlene Daut, Assistant Professor of English and Cultural Studies at Claremont Graduate University, will speak on “Race and the Transatlantic Print Culture of the Haitian Revolution, 1789-1865.” Two weeks later, on April 27th, novelist and professor at Goucher University, Madison Smartt Bell will give a lecture titled “Desalines Disembodied.” On May 11th, our closing lecture of the series will be “Bolívar as Slaveholder, the Image of 1815, and the Myth of Abolition,” by Michael Zeuske of Universität zu Köln, Iberische und Lateinamerikanische Abt./ Historisches Institut.

To register for the February 23rd lecture please click here. For more information about the Colloquium series, and other upcoming events, click here to join our mailing list for weekly updates.

CLACS Students’ Articles Appear on Digital News Networks

A boy plays soccer on a beach in Arnapala, Honduras. Photo by Danielle Mackey, MA '14

A boy plays soccer on a beach in Arnapala, Honduras. Photo by Danielle Mackey, MA ’14

Three Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Journalism dual-degree students had articles published on major digital news outlets this week.

Nicki Fleischner’s article, titled “Alternatives to Detention Leave Some Honduran Immigrants in ‘Schackles appears on the Latin America News Dispatch. In her piece, Fleischner follows a Garífuna woman living in the Bronx who is forced to wear an electronic monitoring device since arriving in the city.

Dusty Christensen examines “Why Innocent People Plead Guilty,” which appears on AlterNet. Christensen’s article addresses the many ways in which defendants are pushed to agree to plea bargains in pre-trial negotiations.

Danielle Mackey, who recently completed her MA Studies in Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Journalism, has written a piece that appears on The New Republic, titled “‘I’ve Seen All Sorts of Horrific Things in My Time. But None as Detrimental to the Country as This.’” Her article explores “charter cities,” the Honduran government’s newest development plan, which sprouts from an idea from New York University economist Paul Romer, and has been deemed “a dangerous economic experiment.”

Nicki Fleischner and Dusty Christensen are currently enrolled in the Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Journalism joint-degree program. Danielle Mackey is a 2014 graduate of the LACS/Journalism joint-degree program. 

The Besieged Polis

Dr. Kevin Casas-Zamora, former Vice-President of Costa Rica and current Secretary for Political Affairs of the Organization of American States, visited the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies to present a talk on his latest book, The Besieged Polis: Citizen Insecurity and Democracy in Latin America. In his latest project, Dr. Casas-Zamora focuses on the threat citizen insecurity poses to emerging Latin American democracies. Defining insecurity as the lack of free exercise of and limitation of fundamental rights, he traces the correlation between citizen insecurity and the threat it poses to democratic governments while offering possible solutions. With the ravages of the drug war in Mexico and Central America, his talk was especially apt in outlining how violence can weaken democratic institutions.

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Dr. Jill Lane and Dr. Kevin Casas-Zamora

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Iskay Qelqaqkuna Boliviamanta New Yorkta Watukunku

Cochabamba Gladys Camacho Bolivia Minas Miners Quechua Felix MuruchiGladys Camacho, Felix Muruchi ima NYUta watukushanku. Iskaykuna kashanku Boliviamanta. Gladys watukushan Lingüística programata. Felix rimaran Evo Moralesmanta, politica Boliviamanta ima CLACSpi. Pay qelqaran huk librota hoq runakunawan, chay libroypa sutin Minero con poder de dinamita: La vida de un activista boliviano. Iskayninku watukunankumanta rimashanku NYU estudiante Charlie Uruchimawan.

Gladys Camacho y Felix Muruchi visitan NYU. Gladys visita el programa de Lingüística y Felix habló sobre Evo Morales y la política en Bolivia en el programa de CLACS. El es co-autor del libro: Minero con poder de dinamita: La vida de un activista boliviano. Gladys y Felix conversan con el estudiante de NYU Charlie Uruchima sobre sus experiencias vividas en la ciudad.

Gladys Camacho and Felix Muruchi are currently visiting NYU from Bolivia. Gladys is a visiting scholar in the Department of Linguistics, and Felix is giving a talk about Evo Morales and Bolivian politics in CLACS. He is also the co-author of the book: From the Mines to the Streets: a Bolivian Activist’s Life. In this podcast, Gladys and Felix speak with NYU student Charlie Uruchima about their experiences visiting New York.


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UNA NOCHE EN COCHABAMBA

Cochabamba, Bolivia

I sat at the table and watched. I was at the co-café in Cochabamba, Bolivia on a cool June night with local cochalos.[1]  We drank, smoked and chewed coca leaves deep into the small hours of the night. It was dreamlike and sublime; the forces of history and destiny brought us here this evening. I am with my friend, Alejandro—a sociology student with Marxist-Leninist inclinations, despite his firm katarista cultivation. The waiter—a friend and fellow sociology student of Alejandro’s—brings us Huari beer after Huari beer; and we smoke cigarettes incessantly.  We are not the only ones doing this; all those who entered the cocafé this evening are drinking and smoking impetuously. It is that kind of night in Cocha.

Cochabamba was the backdrop for the “water war” of early 2000, the series of protests that shook the streets of Cocha between December 1999 and April of 2000. These massive protests arose in response to the government’s attempts to privatize the water supply, and included weeks of waged protests, general strikes, and transportation blockages that brought the country to a virtual standstill. The protests were sparked by the government’s concession to sell Cochabamba’s public water system to foreign investors. The protesters demanded the government break its $200 million contract with private contractors, which had dramatically raised water rates.  Continue reading

Q & A with CLACS Alum Eva Sanchis

Eva Sanchis CLACS Alum

Eva Sanchis, CLACS Alum

Eva Sanchis graduated from the CLACS  joint journalism M.A. program in 2003. At CLACS, she focused her research on media portrayals of Latino communities, and overall media coverage of Latin America and the Caribbean. Since then, she continues to focus on these issues, and has published her work extensively, She recently relocated to London, where she works for the international NGO REDRESS. Here’s more about Eva, her time at CLACS, and her current work.

Q. What did you focus your research on at CLACS?

A. While completing my joint master’s program in Journalism and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU, I had the opportunity to intern with two CNN primetime shows:  American Morning with Paula Zahn and Greenfield at Large. I also began working as a full-time reporter for El Diario-La Prensa, the oldest Spanish-language newspaper in the United States, where I covered the Hispanic and Latin American and Spanish Caribbean communities in New York.  My thesis at CLACS was partly based on these experiences. It examined mainstream media portrayals of those communities in the United States as well as U.S. media coverage of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Q. Is there any connection between your current work and your research at CLACS?

A. Yes, since I completed my M.A. in 2003, my journalistic career has been devoted to writing about Hispanic and Latin American and Spanish Caribbean communities.  An ongoing concern within my work has been to combat distorted perceptions of these communities in the U.S. mainstream media. After NYU, I became the Metro and National News editor at the New York-based El Diario-La Prensa, the U.S.’s second largest Hispanic newspaper.  As editor, I supervised coverage of local and national news, and major international stories such as the 2008 US presidential election, the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, and the earthquake in Chile. Prior to being an editor, I was the New York City Hall Bureau chief for El Diario, and I also reported special coverage from Latin America as an IRP Johns Hopkins’ fellow.  I have written for El Diario and other publications such as the World Policy Journal, the Progressive magazine, and the Financial Times magazine. I was also an adjunct professor at CLACS, where I taught the course “Covering Latino Stories in the United States.”  Since I relocated to London in 2010, I have continued writing as a freelancer about these communities from Europe.

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