Visitas en la sierra

Posted by Bethany Pennington – MA Candidate at NYU CLACS Cuando su hija tenía trece años, una señora del pueblo principal de la región llegó a su casita y le dijo: “préstame su hija, que vive en mi casa, que me ayude.” Recordando este momento, mi nueva amiga me comentó: “Pues, no quiero prestar, porqueContinue reading “Visitas en la sierra”

La Fototeca Nacional (Pachuca, Hidalgo)

Posted by Jason Ahlenius — PhD Student of Spanish and Portuguese at NYU She grew impatient when I did it for the second time. «¡Ay! Por favor, no hagas eso». Please don’t do that. But I did it. I broke the rules. I touched the photographic originals. I desecrated Mexico’s visual patrimony. I have finallyContinue reading “La Fototeca Nacional (Pachuca, Hidalgo)”

The Art of (not) Finding: El Archivo Fotográfico Manuel Toussaint

Posted by Jason Ahlenius – Ph.D. student in Spanish and Portuguese at NYU I have begun to see a pattern in my “explorations” of Mexico’s archives: I arrive at the archive, and spend several days figuring out how to gain access to the archive, or searching through the catalog, only to have someone tell meContinue reading “The Art of (not) Finding: El Archivo Fotográfico Manuel Toussaint”

Sergio Mondragón and Collaborative Translation

  Posted by Zane Koss – PhD Candidate in English Literature at NYU On June 11th, I had the pleasure of meeting with Sergio Mondragón in the Coyoacán neighbourhood of Mexico City. My dissertation focuses on Mexican and Canadian poetry in the 1960s and 1970s, searching for meaningful connections between poets and means of readingContinue reading “Sergio Mondragón and Collaborative Translation”

The Anti-Asylum Measures Impacting Mexico, and Those Implemented by Mexico

Posted by Leandra Barrett – PhD student in Social and Cultural Analysis at NYU Recent news stories, which are as tragic as they are familiar, highlight the ways anti-asylum and anti-migration policies have been implemented worldwide. Such policies, including the United States’ own “Prevention through Deterrence,” have deadly consequences. In North America, migrants experience deadly exposure onContinue reading “The Anti-Asylum Measures Impacting Mexico, and Those Implemented by Mexico”

Looking for Asian ‘mestizaje’ in Mexican History

By Emilia Sawada, PhD Candidate in Social and Cultural Analysis. This post was written in the summer of 2017, based on research funded by the Tinker Grant.  Although I spent only two weeks in the field (Mexico City, Mexico), this research expedition generated a wealth of information about two subjects of interest: post-revolutionary Mexican public artContinue reading “Looking for Asian ‘mestizaje’ in Mexican History”

Impunity Makes Mexico Dangerous for Everyone

Posted by Nidia Bautista – MA Candidate in Global Journalism and CLACS at NYU. This post was written in August, 2017, based on summer research funded by the Tinker Grant.  Mexico has become a dangerous place for everyone. This summer, during the time I spent investigating feminicide in Edomex, has been terrible for human rightsContinue reading “Impunity Makes Mexico Dangerous for Everyone”

Upcoming Events November 6-11, 2017

CLACS has yet another jam-packed week of events for you to attend, engange with, reflect on, and enjoy. If you are unable to attend the event in person, check out our facebook page, because there is a good chance that there will be a live-stream. This week, events range from critically analyzing the aftermath of hurricanesContinue reading “Upcoming Events November 6-11, 2017”

Women’s Work and Sororidad in Ecatepec

Posted by Nidia Bautista – MA Candidate in Global Journalism and CLACS at NYU Feminicide is defined as the extreme violence against women due to their gender, marked by impunity that violates their human rights and results in death. It’s a word that names the violence inflicted on women who were strangled, raped, tortured, mutilated,Continue reading “Women’s Work and Sororidad in Ecatepec”

Ecatepec as Mexico City’s Peripheral Edge

Posted by Nidia Bautista – MA Candidate in Global Journalism and CLACS at NYU Sitting in a cafe in the heart of Mexico City, my source, a high school teacher and organizer working in Ecatepec, Mexico State (Edomex), describes the most populous municipality in the country as a perfect example of the peripheral edge. EcatepecContinue reading “Ecatepec as Mexico City’s Peripheral Edge”