Tag Archives: NYC

CLACS Alum at September 11th Tribute Center

Esther Mares - CLACS AlumEsther Mares is a CLACS graduate who is now a Collections Assistant at the Tribute World Trade Center Visitor Center.

Esther graduated in January 2012 with an MA in Latin American and Caribbean Studies with a concentration in museum studies. She landed a job in her field before she even completed her last semester.

Esther came to NY from Las Vegas, New Mexico, and where studied archaeology and Spanish at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. She has also previously interned at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

At CLACS, her MA thesis investigated the Museum of the City of Las Vegas and its role in producing local culture and Hispanic narratives. While at CLACS she also interned at the Rubin Museum and the Museum of the City of New York (MCNY).
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Odi Gonzales: Nueva Yorkpi Vidanmanta

NY Public Library - NYCKay audiopi, profesor peruano Odi Gonzales rimashan Rebecca Fischerwan, Christine Mladicwan ima. Pay willakun imaynas kan kawsaynin Nueva Yorkpi.

En este audio el profesor peruano Odi Gonzales habla con Rebecca Fischer y Christine Mladic. El cuenta cómo es su vida en Nueva York.

In this podcast, Odi Gonzales, from Cusco, Peru, speaks with Rebecca Fischer and Christine Mladic about life in New York City.

Photo of NYC from the NYPL Digital Gallery


Subscribe to Rimasun via iTunes or via another podcast service
Suscríbete a Rimasun a través de iTunes o a través de otro servicio de podcast
Download this episode (right click, save link as…) / Guarda este episodio

Profile: David Hanna of the CLACS Teacher Residency Program

As part of our K-12 Outreach, CLACS hosts a teacher residency program, attracting local educators who are interested in enhancing the Latin American studies curricula in their classrooms.

David Hanna, a history teacher at University Neighborhood High School in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, teaches Regents prep courses in both Global and U.S. History, as well as AP United States History.  In 2011 he participated in the CLACS Teacher Residency Program.

During his time in the program, he worked with NYU faculty and CLACS staff to research rural to urban migration in Brazil.  He also developed curricular materials about this topic, aimed for high school-aged students.  In January 2012, at the K-12 educator conference that marks the closing of the program, he and other participants presented their curricular materials to their peers. These curricular materials and others are available on the CLACS website for teachers around the world to use free of charge.

According to David, his students responded well to the curriculum, and had a lot to say during the activities. “They were probably the best conversations we had in class all semester,” David says.  He plans to teach the curriculum to future students.

David Hanna Knights of the SeaDavid is an avid history lover, which inspired his career choice.  His interest in history spans much farther than Latin America. This year he published his first book, titled Knights of the Sea, which chronicles the lives of two young naval officers in Maine during the War of 1812.

David says that he had a great experience participating in the teacher residency program, and that he would definitely recommend the program to other educators. “I grew as a teacher by broadening my understanding of Latin America. I also got to share my efforts with teachers from across the city both at the conference, as well as online,” David says.

In addition to the residency program, David is also contributing to the “Teaching Global History” book project, a project that brings educators and scholars together with the common goal of making recent research on global history more accessible to educators and students.

Visit the CLACS website to learn more about the Teacher Residency Program, or to access free K-12 curricular materials.

CLACS Hosts Over 100 Free Events Each Year

CLACS - Washington Square Park - NYU

CLACS is located on the south side of Washington Square Park, in the heart of New York City’s Greenwich Village

Each year, CLACS hosts over 100 events that are free and open to the public.  These Latin America and Caribbean-themed events range from film screenings to lecture series, art exhibits to book readings. Most of our events are followed by a reception, where students, faculty, and community members have the opportunity to connect and discuss. CLACS events are listed on the events page of the CLACS website, the CLACS google calendar, and are also highlighted on the CLACS Facebook page.

You can receive emails about CLACS events that match your interests by signing up for a CLACS email list.  CLACS offers more than 20 unique email lists, each focused on a region or topic. You can subscribe to any email list by entering your email on the CLACS homepage, or through this link to our email management system. Some of the email list options include a weekly digest of all events, K-12 Outreach Program, thematic – such as race and gender, or regional – such as the Andes or the Caribbean.

This semester, CLACS is hosting several extra-exciting events. The Spring 2012 CLACS Research Colloquium focuses on “Latin American Independence in the Age of Revolution,” and features lectures on current research in the area. Scholars such as Robin Blackburn and Sara Johnson are among the list of esteemed speakers. From March 22 through April 11, CLACS and ILAS will host Mundos Andinos, an event series pertaining to the Andean region (details to follow – watch the CLACS website). And on March 26th CLACS will have a screening of the film Granito: How to Nail a Dictator, about human rights abuses in Guatemala, followed by a discussion with Pamela Yates, Paco de Onís, and NYU Historian Greg Grandin.

To see a list of all upcoming CLACS events, visit the events page on the website. To receive CLACS email updates, click here to sign up now!

Teachers in Residence Present at K-12 Educator Conference

CLACS K-12 Educator Conference
Teaching Latin America’s migration history in the classroom can be a challenge. The most recent K-12 Educator Conference focused on just this issue, bringing scholars and educators together for a day of learning and exchange.

Two educators participating in the CLACS Teacher Residency Program spoke at the event. David Hanna currently teaches at University Neighborhood High School, and presented on “The Great (Quiet) Migration: Brazil.” Ariela Rothstein is a teacher at East Brooklyn Community High School, and she gave a presentation on “Perspectives on the Cuban Revolution: Social class, equality of opportunity and equality of outcomes before and after the Cuban Revolution.”

CLACS piloted its first Teacher Residency Program in 2010. Through this program, select teachers work closely with NYU faculty members, NYU Bobst Library resources, and CLACS K-12 outreach staff on Latin American research topics. Residents receive expert support, and have the opportunity to develop curricular materials for use in their classrooms.
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K-12 Educator Series Explores US/Mexico Relations

Indocumentales/Undocumentaries: the US/Mexico Interdependent Film Series Indocumentales/Undocumentaries: the US/Mexico Interdependent Film Series Early this past December, CLACS and what moves you? hosted a series of two K-12 Educator Workshops which focused on two films from the Indocumentales / Undocumentaries US-Mexico Film Series. The December 5th event included a screening of Farmingville; and the December 14th workshop focused on the film Which Way Home.

The events featured an introduction to CLACS resources for educators about Mexico- U.S. issues, followed by a film screening. Educators then had the opportunity to discuss the issues addressed in the film with colleagues and what moves you? facilitators. These workshops opened a space for educators to discuss current events, and how film can be used to teach Mexico-U.S. relations in the classroom.

FarmingvilleFarmingville, a 2004 film by Carlos Sandoval and Catherine Tambini, documents the attempted murders of two Mexican day-laborers in Long Island. The movie features first-hand accounts from residents, day-laborers and activists, and underscores the continuing relevance of undocumented immigrant issues. Which Way Home, a 2009 film by Rebecca Cammisa, focuses on immigrant children from Honduras, El Salvador and Mexico, who must overcome tremendous odds in their journey to the U.S.

These are two of many K-12 events that are part of the CLACS K-12 Outreach Program. Learn more about CLACS K-12 Outreach on the CLACS website. You can also sign-up to our K-12 Outreach email list, which will send you notices only about K-12 educator-related events and programs.

Q & A with CLACS Alum Eva Sanchis

Eva Sanchis CLACS Alum

Eva Sanchis, CLACS Alum

Eva Sanchis graduated from the CLACS  joint journalism M.A. program in 2003. At CLACS, she focused her research on media portrayals of Latino communities, and overall media coverage of Latin America and the Caribbean. Since then, she continues to focus on these issues, and has published her work extensively, She recently relocated to London, where she works for the international NGO REDRESS. Here’s more about Eva, her time at CLACS, and her current work.

Q. What did you focus your research on at CLACS?

A. While completing my joint master’s program in Journalism and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU, I had the opportunity to intern with two CNN primetime shows:  American Morning with Paula Zahn and Greenfield at Large. I also began working as a full-time reporter for El Diario-La Prensa, the oldest Spanish-language newspaper in the United States, where I covered the Hispanic and Latin American and Spanish Caribbean communities in New York.  My thesis at CLACS was partly based on these experiences. It examined mainstream media portrayals of those communities in the United States as well as U.S. media coverage of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Q. Is there any connection between your current work and your research at CLACS?

A. Yes, since I completed my M.A. in 2003, my journalistic career has been devoted to writing about Hispanic and Latin American and Spanish Caribbean communities.  An ongoing concern within my work has been to combat distorted perceptions of these communities in the U.S. mainstream media. After NYU, I became the Metro and National News editor at the New York-based El Diario-La Prensa, the U.S.’s second largest Hispanic newspaper.  As editor, I supervised coverage of local and national news, and major international stories such as the 2008 US presidential election, the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, and the earthquake in Chile. Prior to being an editor, I was the New York City Hall Bureau chief for El Diario, and I also reported special coverage from Latin America as an IRP Johns Hopkins’ fellow.  I have written for El Diario and other publications such as the World Policy Journal, the Progressive magazine, and the Financial Times magazine. I was also an adjunct professor at CLACS, where I taught the course “Covering Latino Stories in the United States.”  Since I relocated to London in 2010, I have continued writing as a freelancer about these communities from Europe.

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