Welcome Back and Upcoming CLACS Events

The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) at NYU would like to welcome back our students and faculty and wishes all our followers a happy Fall! We kicked off the semester by enthusiastically welcoming our newest MA students at orientation. We are excited to have such a dynamic group begin a new academicContinue reading “Welcome Back and Upcoming CLACS Events”

Radio and politics in the Peruvian Altiplano

Posted by Ximena Málaga Sabogal, PhD student in Anthropology at NYU I am used to being asked what anthropology is and what, as an anthropologist, do I “actually” do. I usually have a different set of answers depending on my interlocutors. But something that I always have to deal with is the “classical” definition ofContinue reading “Radio and politics in the Peruvian Altiplano”

Indigenous Puno?

Posted by Ximena Málaga Sabogal – PhD student in Anthropology at NYU It has been a couple of weeks since I arrived in Puno, one of the biggest cities in the southern Peruvian Andes. I have a long history with this city, having researched in the area throughout my bachelor and masters degree. Still, Puno wasContinue reading “Indigenous Puno?”

Quechua/Kichwa Film Showcase on the Road

From June 17th to the 19th the Quechua/Kichwa film showcase May Sumak! (How Beautiful!) is going on the road  to Washington, D.C. The showcase is a celebration of indigenous and community filmmaking in the Quechua languages spoken throughout the Andes and by immigrants in the United States. Created in 2015 by the CLACS student-led Runasimi Outreach CommitteeContinue reading “Quechua/Kichwa Film Showcase on the Road”

Colloquium Series Presentation: Irene Silverblatt

By Michael Cary, CLACS MA Student On Monday, February 1st, CLACS inaugurated the Spring 2016 Colloquium Series with a presentation by Irene Silverblatt. The theme for this semester’s colloquium series is “Political Imaginaries Across Latin America and the Caribbean” and Silverblatt, a professor of cultural anthropology at Duke University, spoke on race thinking and SpanishContinue reading “Colloquium Series Presentation: Irene Silverblatt”

Andean Culture Night

Last night we celebrated Andean culture at the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center. The Runasimi Outreach Committee and Center for Latin American Studies hosted various community groups and artists representing Ecuador, Perú and Bolivia for the last Quechua night of the year. Participants included: Ñukanchik Llakta Wawakuna dancing Kawsay La Vida and reading aContinue reading “Andean Culture Night”

Las implicaciones contextuales de las traducciones al quechua

  Post and interview by Raúl A. Rodríguez Arancibia, MA Candidate at CLACS – Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU Para más información sobre la presentación del estudio crítico del Dr. Odi Gonzales en NYU el 18 de noviembre de 2015 visite http://ow.ly/Ufutn. Los textos literarios no pueden ser únicamente comprendidos y traducidos exitosamenteContinue reading “Las implicaciones contextuales de las traducciones al quechua”

Profesor de CLACS presenta estudio crítico de la versión quechua del Quijote

Post and interview by Raúl A. Rodríguez Arancibia,MA Candidate at CLACS – Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU Para más información sobre la presentación del estudio crítico del Dr. Odi Gonzales en NYU el 18 de noviembre de 2015 visite http://ow.ly/Ufutn. En Latinoamérica, una región con una amplia población indígena, en las últimas décadasContinue reading “Profesor de CLACS presenta estudio crítico de la versión quechua del Quijote”

An Eighty-Five Year-Old Case of Plagiarism

Posted by Amy Obermeyer, doctoral student in Comparative Literature at NYU My time in the archives at the Biblioteca Nacional de Perú , like most archival work was filled with its shares of disappointment big and small—of missing materials and dead-end leads, of bad ideas and boring ones—alongside the daily monotony of combing through ancientContinue reading “An Eighty-Five Year-Old Case of Plagiarism”

“Un caso sensacional y atentatorio a la soberanía del País”

Posted by Amy Obermeyer, doctoral student in Comparative Literature On May 13, 1940, a series of anti-Japanese riots took place in Lima. The tumult continued for days. Despite massive violence and unrest, police took no action to quell the tension; ten were dead, damages totaling $6 million were reported, affecting in total 620 households, andContinue reading ““Un caso sensacional y atentatorio a la soberanía del País””